marahfreedom

Posts Tagged ‘Democracy’

7 Articles On Democracy : Malaysia’s Own ‘Syrian’ Crisis-lite, LGBT Apartheid in Malaysia On Top of Socio-Political Apartheid, East Malaysians Lied To – No 100% is Granted – Might As Well Secede, RPK Coward Fearful to Run For MP – Full of NLPs, Big Deal About No Effort by Penang’s CM – Farcical and Cynical Self Praise, Mindless Arguing On Non-Issues By Equally Mindless Supporter of Nepotism Who Is Unfortunately An Wakil Parti MP, Lee-postism Hides Behind the ‘Ammah’ – reposted by @AgreeToDisagree – 23rd September 2012

In 1% tricks and traps, 2 term limits, Abuse of Power, amendments to law needed, asset declarations, best practices, Bumiputera Apartheid, criticism, Democracy, democratisation, dhimmi, dhimmitude, domestic terrorists in the political sphere, LGBT, LGBT Hate Groups, Nepotism, neurolinguistics, orang asli on September 22, 2012 at 8:01 pm

ARTICLE 1

67th session of UNGA :World leaders to debate on Syrian crisis, terrorism – Un general assembly – 19 Sep 2012 12:05:47 PM IST – Last Updated : 19 Sep 2012 12:05:47 PM IST

The Syrian conflict ,peaceful resolution of international disputes and an efficient global coordinated response to terrorism were the important issues that will dominate the 67th session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) that started on Tuesday at the UN Headquarters in New York.

Vuk Jeremic, the former Serbian foreign minister who was elected president of the 67th UNGA session on June 8, said in an opening address that the General Assembly is “the only forum where all (UN) member states come together as sovereign equals to advance the aims of the UN Charter.

Jeremic said: “I look forward to engaging with all delegations, in furtherance of shared goals and objectives.”

“Having consulted widely on the matter, I have chosen bringing about adjustment or settlement of international disputes or situations by peaceful means as the overarching theme for our work over the next 12 months,” he added.

Over a 100 world leaders and policy makers will arrive  next week for the annual general debate that will run through September 25 till October 1 and would focus on the peaceful settlement of international disputes.

“We are living through a period of unease. These are times of rising unemployment, rising inequality, rising temperatures  and rising intolerance,” UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said in his remarks at the opening of the UNGA
session yesterday.

“We are also seeing incidents of intolerance and hatred that are then exploited by others. Voices of moderation and calm need to make themselves heard at this time. We all need to speak up in favour of mutual respect and understandingof the values and beliefs of others.

“The United Nations itself must rise to the moment,”Ban said. He said the UNGA faces a long and urgent agenda,where “the deteriorating situation in Syria will be foremost in our minds.”

Other important high-level meetings and initiatives on energy, women’s health, nutrition and education, peace and security challenges would also dominate the discussions of the world leaders.
“This organisation is being asked to do more than ever before. People want results in real time, not years.That is why we will also be working together during this session to deepen our efforts to strengthen and modernize the United Nations itself,” Ban said.

President of the 193-member body Vuk Jeremic, who took over from Nassir Abdulaziz Al-Nasser, outlined the main areas of focus for this year’s session, with the main theme being the peaceful settlement of international disputes.

“Peace and security is a prerequisite for the stability needed for global economic growth, sustainable development and social progress,” Jeremic said. Jeremic also highlighted the importance of making progress on arms control and disarmament, strengthening UN peacekeeping, improving a global coordinated response to terrorism, and promoting human rights in the international arena during the next 12 months.

He stressed that the Assembly should focus not just on achieving the eight anti-poverty targets of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), but also on the post-2015 agenda. In addition, he emphasized that the rule of law would remain one of the main priorities on the Assembly?s agenda.  “Close to 800 years after the Magna Carta was promulgated, many people around the world still do not enjoy the fundamental rights enshrined in that seminal documentrights that protect individuals, while enabling countries to
develop in peace and security, as sovereign equals,” he said.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Domestic ‘political terrorists’ among MPs have seized power from near 40% of the population since the 1970s as well as East Malaysia’s Orang Asli, and hijacked Malaysia’s parliament by not granting :

1) Freedom from Apartheid/Fascism (Article 1 Human Rights Charter)
2) Freedom from Religious-Persecution/Religious-Supremacy. (Article 18 Human Rights Charter)
3) Equality for all ethnicities and faiths in all aspects of policy, Law and Constitution. (Surah An Nisa 4:75)

Will the UN take action on this form of political terrorist by demanding of the Malaysian  government via blackballs or expulsions of pro-apartheid-Malays who refuse to CLEARLY STATE their denunciatuion via ‘Statuary Declaration’ from all world bodies linked to UN, to ensure the end of apartheid and free the people of Malaysia by granting the above 3 items? The Magna Carta does not allow the form of apartheid as the Malaysian regime today enforces by threat of fines and imprisonment and refusal to amend laws and constitution.

ARTICLE 2

Focus is on preventing, correcting homosexuality, says deputy minister – by Hafidz Baharom – September 20, 2012

KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 20 — Deputy Education Minister Datuk Mohd Puad Zarkashi said the government will push forward in educating parents on how to prevent, overcome and correct symptoms of homosexuality in children.

But he told The Malaysian Insider today that there will be no published guidelines to identify gay and lesbian traits, saying that the Education Ministry was not involved in hosting the “Parents Handling LGBT Issues” seminars including one he launched in Kedah earlier today.

Mohd Puad (picture) did not however elaborate on what the government would do to “correct” or “prevent” homosexuality.

Gender equality advocates have attacked Putrajaya for sending the wrong message about sexuality and social conformity by endorsing controversial “guidelines” aimed at helping parents recognise “symptoms” of homosexuality in children.

The groups had demanded the federal government retract its endorsement, saying the descriptions are misleading and may lead to discrimination against the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LBGT) community.

Putrajaya had reportedly endorsed a list of identifiable gay and lesbian traits that was distributed to schools and parents, published by the Yayasan Guru Malaysia Bhd and Putrajaya Consultative Council of Parents and Teachers Associations.

The guidelines are ostensibly aimed at preventing the “spread” of the phenomenon among teenagers, especially students, according to media reports last week.

Education Ministry officials had subsequently denied endorsing the list, which says that gay men have muscular bodies and like to show off by wearing V-neck and sleeveless clothes, prefer tight and light-coloured clothing, are attracted to men and like to carry big handbags similar to those used by women.

Lesbians are said to be attracted to women, like to eat, sleep and hang out in the company of other women and have no affection for men.

“There are no such published guidelines and I was only invited to officiate these events by the non-government organisations involved,” said Mohd Puad today.

“We in the Ministry of Education look at this LGBT issue seriously, and all we wish to do is to educate people, parents especially, on how to overcome this issue, how to prevent it as well as early corrective measures,” he said.

He added that these seminars were “not an attack” on the LGBT community in Malaysia.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Could the UN condemn and counter this abusive action by Puad and the PTA here? The UN needs to speak with a very clear voice to Malaysian or fundo state abusers, that abusive policies and discriminative policies that discriminate any and all persons will be disallowed. Which Universities have Alumnis or have awarded all APARTHEID persons in goverbnment in places like Malaysia? WITHDRAW all these abusers’ degrees and make these bullies jobless and bar all individuals from UN offices as persona non grata apartheid monkeys or pro-apartheid lapdogs.

Identify all Embassy workers for a start and begin expulsions of the same, not tacitly approve the LGBT APARTHEID promulgated by these nations by allowing them to have an Embassy presence. Bravo Canada for making clear on Iran, though a less obvious state that does not appear civilisationally at war with another would be better to target. How about expelling Malaysian Embassy from Canada after clarifying with the Education Ministry first Canada? Some of us do not even have the option to consider LGBT lifestyle regardless of our preference. Life is a jopurney of experience, no so-called ‘Education Ministry’ or ‘Religious/Moral

Police’ or ‘Fundo Religion’ (more like a NAZI style Propaganda ministry) has the right to decide how any person lives, or back the same illo treatment with jail terms and fines. Some of us have endured inhumane levels of abuse from society and psychiatric establishment chemical poisoning alongside religious fundamentalist actions to fight for any to have a right to have a choice, UN has the capacity and netwotrk to prevent the abusers from being affiliated with responsible Universities or having standing in the WHO and Pychiatric establishment at least. Will the UN not act for UN principles of Humanity and equality, end of APARTHEID?

United Nations Foundation – The Time Has Come for LGBT Rights (Then condemn and remove the offenders from civil and polite and educated society degreee holder lists as suggested above at once. End APARTHEID in Malaysia as well!)

http://www.unfoundation.org/blog/the-time-has-come-for-lgbt-rights.html

UN Report Calls for LGBT Rights Worldwide | Montreal Gazette
http://blogs.montrealgazette.com/2011/12/16/un-report-calls-for-lgbt-rights-worldwide/

http://www.iglhrc.org/cgi-bin/iowa/home/index.html

I was unable to send through the UN site, so I am using this ‘anonymous mail’ service to inquiries2@un.org, Error message below :

Contact Us – Technical Questions

CDONTS.NewMail.1 error ‘80020009’

The application your are attempting to access is currently being reset. Please try your request again.

/apps/incNews/send_email.asp, line 22

BORN FREE AND EQUAL
United Nations Releases New Guidelines To Promote LGBT Safety And Equality

The United Nations Human Rights Office has released Born Free and Equal, a new publication outlining international human rights laws for LGBT people.  The 60-page booklet focuses on five core obligations requiring national attention:

protecting people from homophobic violence, preventing torture, decriminalizing homosexuality, prohibiting discrimination, and safeguarding LGBT people’s freedoms of expression, association and peaceful assembly.

Think Progress outlines the major policies:

– Protect people from homophobic and transphobic violence.

– Include sexual orientation and gender identity as protected characteristics in hate crime laws.

– Establish effective systems to record and report hate-motivated acts of violence.

– Ensure effective investigation and prosecution of perpetrators and redress for victims of such violence.

– Asylum laws and policies should recognize that persecution on account of one’s sexual orientation or gender identity may be a valid basis for an asylum claim.

– Prevent the torture and cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment of LGBT persons in detention by prohibiting and punishing such acts and ensuring that victims are provided with redress.

– Investigate all acts of mistreatment by State agents and bring those responsible to justice.

– Provide appropriate training to law enforcement officers and ensure effective monitoring of places of detention.

– Repeal laws criminalizing homosexuality, including all laws that prohibit private sexual conduct between consenting adults of the same sex.

– Ensure that individuals are not arrested or detained on the basis of their sexual orientation or gender identity, and are not subjected to baseless and degrading physical examinations intended to determine their sexual orientation.

– Prohibit discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.

– Enact comprehensive laws that include sexual orientation and gender identity as prohibited grounds of discrimination. In particular, ensure non-discriminatory access to basic services, including in the context of employment and health care.

– Provide education and training to prevent discrimination and stigmatization of LGBT and intersex people.

– Safeguard freedom of expression, association and peaceful assembly for LGBT and intersex people. Any limitations on these rights must be compatible with international law and must not be discriminatory.

– Protect individuals who exercise their rights to freedom of expression, association and freedom of assembly from acts of violence and intimidation by private parties.

While these guidelines are necessary steps toward inclusiveness of LGBT people, blogger Nancy Polikoff of Beyond (Straight and Gay) Marriage, notes that there are no provisions for same-sex parents:

The UN report does have a chapter about discrimination (and says it is bad), but nothing in that chapter mentions discrimination in adoption or access to assited reproduction or child custody.  The report lists some areas of concern when it comes to discrimination, naming employment, health, and education.  There is mention that States need not allow same-sex marriage under international human rights law but that same-sex couples should prevail on anti-discrimination grounds when it comes to such matters as pensions, inheritance, and other partner circumstances.  This makes it especially odd that the report does not mention LGBT parenting when international human rights law definitely does contain a nondiscrimination principle in that area.

http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Publications/BornFreeAndEqualLowRes.pdf

ARTICLE 3

Sabah: Still a ‘fixed deposit’? – Friday, 21 September 2012 Super Admin

Sabah will be a focal point in the coming general election, especially after the defections of two BN MPs. If the opposition can avoid contesting three-cornered contests then Sabah’s status as a BN ‘fixed deposit’ state could hang in the balance, writes Arnold Puyok.

ALIRAN

The upcoming 13th General Election is sure to be a hotly contested election. It will be a litmus test for Prime Minister Najib Razak who is banking on his “transformational agenda” to return the BN to power.

Indeed, to restore the BN to a two-thirds majority. For PR, the election is seen as Anwar Ibrahim’s last chance to take over Putrajaya after the alleged September 16 coup failed. Even though many of the seats contested come from Peninsular Malaysia, the real battle will be in Sabah and Sarawak.

In the 2008 General Election, the 54 seats from East Malaysia ensured BN a simple majority win. Without the 54 seats, BN would have lost power to the opposition, in the event of party crossovers. Consequently Sabah and Sarawak are considered as BN’s “fixed deposits”.

This article is an attempt to look into the prospects and challenges of the 13th General Election in Sabah especially in light of the withdrawal of two Sabah leaders from BN – Wilfred Bumburing of UPKO (United Pasok Momogun Kadazandusun Association) and Lajim Ukin of Sabah UMNO (United Malays National Organisation).

With the persistent attacks on Sabah Chief Minister, Musa Aman for his alleged involvement in an international money laundering scandal and the Wilfred-Lajim factor, BN is expected to face a tough challenge from the opposition to retain Sabah. The article argues that if the opposition is able to form a strong alliance and avoid contesting against each other, it could affect Sabah’s fixed deposit status. Similarly, failure on BN’s part to address the perennial Sabah issues such as the illegal immigrant problems and state autonomy will affect its chances of returning to power.

Categorising the seats contested

For analytical purposes, all the 60 state and 25 parliamentary seats contested in Sabah will be divided into three categories: “safe” BN seats (where BN has more than an 80 percent chance of winning), “marginal” or “50-50” seats (where electoral support can go either to BN or the opposition) and “opposition” seats (where the opposition has more than an 80 percent chance of winning). This prospect is based on the following two factors: 1) Changes in the number of registered voters according to age and ethnicity and 2) Less multi-cornered but more one-to-one contests in the “marginal” areas. The opposition here refers to PR comprising PKR (Parti Keadilan Rakyat), DAP (Democratic Action Party), and PAS (Parti Islam Se-Malaysia). The other local-based opposition parties are STAR (State Reform Party) Sabah and SAPP (Sabah People’s Progressive Party).

The safe BN seats

There are 42 safe BN state seats and most are Muslim-majority. At the parliamentary level, there are nine safe BN seats with a large number of Muslim Bumiputera voters and they all belong to UMNO. (See Table 1 & 2) With the absence of alternative Muslim-based parties, the majority of the Muslim electorate will remain in UMNO. Among the weapons used by UMNO to maintain Muslim support are the persistent championing of Islam as a religion that unites the Muslims and the practice of on-the-spot development funds allocation.

The Muslim-majority areas will be BN’s key seats that will help maintain the party’s grip on power. PKR appears to fail to take the Muslim support from UMNO. One of the reasons is the lack of credible and popular Muslim leaders in the party. The present Sabah PKR chief, Ahmad Thamrin is not popular among the Muslim electorate while another well-known Muslim leader, Ansari Abdullah, does not have strong Muslim support beyond his base in Tuaran.

There is also the assumption that UMNO is falling apart due to the factions formed by supporters of Musa Aman and Federal Minister, Shafie Afdal. However, the so-called factions do not affect UMNO that much. So far, Musa has been able to keep the Muslim support in UMNO intact. Musa has also successfully defused the Bajau challenge led by Salleh Said, a former Chief Minister and currently Sabah UMNO deputy chief.

Despite the attacks on Musa for his alleged involvement in a financial scandal, Najib seems to be mindful not to pursue the case with intensive investigations. Najib knows that Musa has the clout to decide the fate of BN in Sabah.

Asking Musa to resign before the election would put Sabah BN at great risk. The question is, if Musa resigned, who will be the most likely candidate to replace him? Many people believe that Najib has an eye on Shafie, his loyal ally from Semporna, Sabah. But others have mentioned Salleh Said, Musa’s number two in Sabah UMNO. Salleh is considered more liberal, in tune with the times and therefore, potentially, acceptable to Najib. Another possible candidate is Hajiji Noor, a senior UMNO member in the Sabah Cabinet.

The marginal or 50-50 seats

There are 10 marginal or 50-50 seats at the state level. Of the 10 seats, three are currently held by Gerakan (Parti Gerakan Rakyat Malaysia), two each by LDP (Liberal Democratic Party), PBS (Parti Bersatu Sabah), and SAPP respectively,

and one by UPKO. The three seats currently held by Gerakan previously belonged to LDP (1) and SAPP (2) previously. After an internal party conflict, Peter Pang, Au Kam Wah and Raymond Tan left their parties and joined the Gerakan.

The three seats are considered as marginal as they were won under LDP and SAPP tickets. There is a high possibility that the voters might change their support to the opposition as a mark of protest over the decision of their leaders to join the peninsular-based Gerakan. The two state seats currently held by LDP, Tg. Kapor and Merotai, were won by Teo Chee Kang and Pang Yuk Ming after the opposition failed to agree on a one-to-one contest in 2008. The opposition’s chances of winning the two seats from BN are high in the upcoming election if it can avoid multi-cornered fights.

The other two marginal seats are in Tandek and Kadamaian. The PBS won the two seats in 2008 by marginal majorities. Grassroots sentiments in the two areas seem to indicate that the voters are unhappy with BN over its failure to address a number of local issues such as Native Customary Rights (NCR) land and poverty. The BN’s handling of the Tambatuon dam in Kadamaian has also been strongly criticised. Many people are also calling for the incumbent BN representatives to step down and to allow “winnable” candidates to take over. There are several lobby groups in Kadamaian that call for the incumbent Herbert Timbun Lagadan to make way for a younger candidate.

Likas and Luyang are regarded as marginal seats simply because both were won under SAPP when the party was still with BN. With SAPP now outside the ruling party, the opposition has raised its stakes in the two areas. The SAPP’s victory in the two areas in 2008 with marginal majorities shows that the opposition is highly popular there. In fact, had the DAP and PKR agreed to co-operate, SAPP would have lost in the 2008 election. The voters’ mood in the upcoming election will depend on SAPP’s next course of action.

So far, SAPP has not made any decision as to whether it would re-join BN or remain with the opposition. SAPP appears to have a “game” of its own. SAPP’s neither “here-nor-there” stance has not been well received by other local-based opposition parties even though its leaders could be seen attending political rallies organised by other opposition parties. SAPP’s future will depend on how well it can lobby to contest in Chinese and mixed areas. But again this will be difficult as DAP has strongly indicated its desire to contest in Chinese-majority areas. Unless SAPP and STAR Sabah are willing to compromise, they will have to contest against each other in mixed areas.

There are 13 marginal seats at the parliamentary level. Four of the seats are currently held by UPKO and UMNO, three by PBS, and two by SAPP. Most of the marginal parliamentary seats are non-Muslim Bumiputera-majority. The prospect of all 12 seats remaining with BN is dependent upon the reaction of the voters to the RCI (Royal Commission of Inquiry) to investigate the presence of illegal immigrants in Sabah and leadership issues.

Three of the main parties representing the Kadazandusuns are PBS, UPKO and PBRS (Parti Bersatu Rakyat Sabah). Joseph Pairin Kitingan, the president of PBS, is now regarded by the Kadazandusuns as an ineffective leader who is not as aggressive as before in fighting for state rights and autonomy. Pairin has defended PBS’ “accommodative” and “census-building” approach but the Kadazandusuns see it as a sign of weak leadership.

Bernard Dompok, the president of UPKO is also in a dilemma after the withdrawal of his deputy, Wilfred Bumburing from BN. It is believed that more UPKO members will leave the party, if not sooner, then later. Dompok, who was previously praised for speaking against the banning of the word “Allah” in Catholic churches, is now slowly losing influence in Penampang. Joseph Kurup who leads another Kadazandusun-based party, PBRS, could lose his seat in

Pensiangan if he fails to address local sentiments there. He won the seat uncontested in 2008 after the candidacy of the opposition candidate was rejected on “technical grounds”.

The performance of the Kadazandusun-based BN parties will be seriously affected given the negative perception of the Kadazandusun electorate towards Kadazandusun leaders. The Kadazandusun voters have the habit of “kicking” their leaders out of office. This was evident in 1995 when many of the Kadazandusun leaders (for instance, Bernard Dompok and Jeffrey Kitingan) who left PBS in 1994 were voted out. In fact, BN lost in all the non-Muslim Bumiputera seats in 1995.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Kadazandusun voters have the habit of “kicking” their leaders out of office.

A respectable and democracy enhancing trait if anything. Term limitless and nepotistic leaders lead to Libyas, Tunisias, Egypts and Syrias etc.. That is why dictatorships fail That is why elements of dictatorship like term limitlessness and nepotism harm democracy. That is why when DAP terms 20% as equality, Sabah and Sarawak might as well secede when Sabah and Sarawak should be given 100% to dispense as they see fit. Finally the non-Muslim AND genetically non-Malay ORANG ASLI of East Malaysia are not Bumiputra and have ceased being 1st class citizens since East Malaysia joing Malaysia. Any non-Muslim is not a 1st class citizen. this amounts to RELIGIOUS APARTHEID which is ILLEGAL in Islam and ILLEGAL by UN standards. Think and demand your right as EQUAL Humans as granted by UN signatorues and Islam, equality via the 3 items below Orang Asli, all non-Muslims and non-Malays in your own country Malaysia!

1) Freedom from Apartheid/Fascism (Article 1 Human Rights Charter)
2) Freedom from Religious-Persecution/Religious-Supremacy. (Article 18 Human Rights Charter)
3) Equality for all ethnicities and faiths in all aspects of policy, Law and Constitution. (Surah An Nisa 4:75)

ARTICLE 4

Like a trapped animal (part 1) – THE CORRIDORS OF POWER – Saturday, 22 September 2012

My friends told me I was crazy. “What are you going to do if your prediction does not come true?” they asked me. “Well, I suppose I will quietly leave the country,” I joked. “Never fear, though,” I told them. “There is such a thing called a self-fulfilling prophecy. If enough people believe it, it will happen.”

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

My friends told me I was crazy. . . (oh great, starts with a negative NLP . . . bravo RPK for more b.s.)

Didn’t even bother to read from this dis-affirmative paragraph . . . on believing in what is right no matter the odds and attempting to make a change for the better. Throughout history, numbers did not matter and still never do. Try MLK’s ending of slavery AND apartheid in USA. Try the Prophet Mohammad’s near destruction of almost all all unique faiths in the Middle East. Try China’s beating off of near half the world which had invaded China. Try Mahatma Gandhi’s ending of COLONIALISM in India. Try the Stonewall Club in USA for LGBTs! These were single men who started from nothing, even when RPK’s ‘enough people’ refused to think for something better but something worse. Still using that intellect to oppress and suppress LGBT indirectly? Dhimmify non-Muslims? This is why Islamophobia exists. When supposed educated Muslims like RPK slither around in this manner writing in this manner, the world will know that Islam is a faith of segregation and disenfranchisement, of narrow communalism.

Now when ‘RPKs’ and ‘NikAzizs” (2 sides of the good cop bad cop coin?) also promote limb hacking hudud as well, Islam’s credibility goes out the window frightening everyone who is even semi-civilised and even galvanises the world to put an end to what is Nazi-Zion type mindsets that must never be allowed in government or UN. Though private clubs and even city districts with majority for extreme Hudud Islam RPK/Nik Aziz style for certain are a ‘right’ – which so far in Malaysia are still a no go because Hudud and who knows even Islam hold no appeal to most modern Muslims and Malays, who are not even Muslims to begin with but are spiritually colonized by the Middle Eastern ‘centre of Islam’. Be fair and think fairly Muslims.

The above facts are logic and an indictment on Islam’s non-viability and somehow or other, fringe encouraging outlook cynically perhaps as Shiites would claim, Sunnite and Arab encouraged behaviour with the Iranians Zoroastrians originally while Arabs worshipped 1 god for every day of the year . . . RPK wants to say ‘If enough people believe it, it will happen.’ well the Prophet decided alone (with Spirit Jibril), that Islam was to replace every religion in the Middle East. So if  ‘If enough people DID NOT believe in Islam,’ WHY even speak in this manner? Bumiputra Apartheid must end if Malays are to raised to the status of an ‘equal’ race, and the issue is neither about enough people or a single person’s beliefs, but the logic behind the action – and logic behind LGBT liasons is that there is no difference between recreational sex between any or either genders. Procreational sex being the issue though the Quran does not state any prohibitions on the former. The way Malaysian Muslims think is akin to throwing sticks and stones at the faith they supposedly love so much. Every time RPK speaks, the shallowness of logic becomes even more evident. Islam is not a tool of control, and Malays have not appreciated the spirit of Islam, even as non-Muslims already understand what the Quran was teaching!

Instead of trying to end individualism and critical thought, try a more sincere and humanitarian approach to thinking first. Will shame Islam and Muslims less. RPK does not represent a good Muslim, but an authoritarian minded mob minded bombast (pun not intended, incidental). Is the animal a trap or is the trap an animal? RPK is certainly too busy sounding intelligent to nake any sense anymore.

ARTICLE 5

Penang CM pays for own house rent, says aide – by Ida Lim – September 22, 2012

Lim was paying 20 per cent of the rental using his salary, said Ng. — File pic
KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 22 ― Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng partly pays for the rental of his house from “his own pocket”, political secretary Ng Wei Aik said today.

Gerakan had attacked the DAP secretary-general and claimed that he owns the property, Ng said.

Refuting Gerakan’s allegation, Ng said Lim was renting the “fully-furnished” house at the rate of RM5,000 a month.

“As CM (Chief Minister), he is entitled to RM4,000 housing allowance paid by the state government every month.

“It means that CM has to fork out another RM1,000 from his own pocket to pay the rental,” said Ng in an email today, adding that it “cannot be considered as luxury property as it has no swimming pool.”

“We have practised the highest degree of integrity all this while, even to the extent [of making] public the tenancy agreement even though this is only CM’s rented property,” he said, adding that the agreement was shown this morning.

Earlier today, Ng pointed out that leaders from the ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition need not to explain their purchase of houses, citing the former Selangor mentri besar Mohamad Khir Toyo as an example.

“On Gerakan’s attacks on CM’s rented house, it seems that Lim Guan Eng is the only CM or MB (mentri besar) in Malaysia who is asked to explain [his] renting a house to stay as compared to BN leaders who need not to explain, even though they buy houses, some like palace resort owned by Khir Toyo,” he said at a press conference.

Ng said that Lim had decided to rent the “fully-furnished” house three years ago after discovering that repairs to the chief minister’s official residence would cost an estimated RM500,000.

The official state residence, Sri Teratai, “was in a very bad condition and infested with termites,” the Komtar state assemblyman said.

Pakatan Rakyat (PR) took over Penang from the BN component party Gerakan after Election 2008.

BN Penang has increasingly attacked Lim’s administration as the 13th general election draws near.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

So clever! (am being sarcastic, but thick skinned politicians would misrepresent anything, so here the clarification for the unwary or liars . . . ) Yeah right. Paying one’s own rent is nothing to be proud of. Pay that rent out of the MP’s salary that the taxpayers are already handing over this 750 CM moocher! All that money comes from taxpayer funds. All people barring certain government civil servants pay 100% of their own rent. Do the taxpayers even want to pay any of CM Lim Guan Eng’s rent at all? Does YM CM Lim Guan Eng ask the taxpayers if they preferred not to pay for the CM’s rent so as to make amendments to have any future CM pay out of his own pocket than presume to keep taking that money from the taxpayers?

1.5 terms up. Time for a 1 man 1 vote for who becomes the next CM as well as stopping payments from taxpayer monies to whatever future CM (mush less 750K funerals) Mr. Undemorcratic Beneficiary of Nepotism! GTFO of Dewan!

ARTICLE 6

Ngeh: Apology over Twitter remark enough, move on – by Ida Lim – September 22, 2012

Ngeh’s remark had led to hundreds of police reports being lodged against him. — File pic
KUALA LUMPUR, Sept 22 ― Datuk Ngeh Koo Ham said today he believes his apology should sufficiently calm Muslim anger over his recent tweet asking if the protests against the anti-Islam clip “Innocence of Muslims” were a waste of “time and energy”.

The prime minister had earlier questioned Ngeh’s sincerity, reportedly saying: “If it is that easy, we can also pass remarks, insult and ridicule other religions and later apologise.”

According to Bernama Online today, the police may investigate Ngeh for his remarks, which had sparked off protests among Muslim leaders here who accused the leader of being insensitive to Muslims worldwide.

But Ngeh told The Malaysian Insider today that it was time to bury the hatchet and move on to more important issues.

He had on Thursday said that he had not meant to hurt Muslim sensitivities or belittle Islam with the offending message on the Twitter microblogging site.

“Forget the past and focus on the future and other issues that are more important,” he told The Malaysian Insider today.

“Because there are many other things like the economy, social problems and the difficulties faced by the people that I need to solve,” he said.

Datuk Seri Mohamed Nazri Abdul Aziz, an Umno minister, had yesterday called for the police to probe Ngeh over his remarks.

Yesterday, DAP’s Lim Guan Eng said Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak should not be “uncharitable and small-minded” over Ngeh’s apology.

He pointed out that Ngeh’s apology and retraction yesterday proved that Pakatan Rakyat (PR) leaders were more gracious and willing to admit to their mistakes or shortcomings, unlike the politicians in Najib’s Barisan Nasional (BN).

Lim also told Najib to look at his own members in BN before passing any judgment against Ngeh, pointing out that many in the ruling coalition who made offensive statements in the past had not found it necessary to apologise later.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

The people will not move on, until DAP completes the 90% failed campaign promises that won DAP whatever seats in GE12. Until then expect every single tweet and twit in DAP to be hammered all the time. Where are the MP assset declarations. Where are the Local Council Elections (meanwhile the EXCO are taking taxpayer funds)? What happened to those small trader confiscated gas tanks? Have the amendments to failures in democracy within DAP’s nepotistic party and state laws been amended? No? Then NEVER ENOUGH until DAP falls in all states! Vote 3rd Force only! Ngeh has been around for more than 2 terms. Remove this oligarch who refuses to declare assets that is wasting the Rakyat’s time and money!

ARTICLE 7

LIFE WITH THE LEES: Nanny shares memories of working for Kuan Yew & family – by  enorth.com.cn – Saturday, 22 September 2012 10:52

94-year-old Ouyang Huan Yan, Yan Kou, from Shunde, worked for Singapore’s first family as a nanny for four decades.

Yan Kou, when she was 18, came to Singapore with her sister. She started work with famous overseas Chinese Tan Kah Kee’s family for nine years. After the war, Lee Kuan Yew’s mother employed her to work for the Lees.

After working for the Lees for 1 year, Lee Kuan Yew returned from his overseas studies in the UK.

Lee Kuan Yew wrote in his memoirs, his wife would go to office every day, his young children were taken care of by reliable Guangdong maids. Yan Kou is one of them. While with the Lees, Yan Kou started with doing the laundry, shopping and other chores. Yan Kou worked for the Lees for 40 years until 1986 when she and her sister returned to Shunde.

Recently, reporter Weng Shuxian visited Yan Kou to listen to her memories of working as a nanny for Singapore’s first family.

Simple wedding

Yan Kou also remembered that after Lee Kuan Yew became the Prime Minster, she would often bring the children to the Istana after school in the afternoon. Lee Kuan Yew would entertain foreign dignitaries at the Istana, but continued to live at his Oxley home with his family.

Yan Kou would often prepares a simple breakfast at the home, Lee Kuan Yew usually drank a glass of Ovaltine, ate 2 pieces of bread and 2 eggs. Mrs Lee worked in the day as a lawyer, but in the evening after work she continued to do house chores, take care of the children and prepare dinner.

When Yan Kou first met Lee Kuan Yew, he just came back from his oversea studies in the UK, he was not very well versed in Mandarin then. But in person, Lee Kuan Yew was not westernized, instead he was rather traditional. When Lee Hsien Loong was only a few years old, Lee Kuan Yew brought a set of long sleeves mandarin jacket for his son during the Chinese New year.

A strict dad

Yan Kou revealed that Lee Kuan Yew was strict with the children. The children were also obedient, humble and not proud unlike children from other well to do families.

When Lee Kuan Yew disciplined the children privately in his room, no one was allowed to enter, even Mrs Lee was not allowed to intervene, or enter. The children would not dare to talk back. Although Yan Kou and the workers have never seen how Lee Kuan Yew disciplined the children, they would know from the children’s expression when they came out.

Yan Kou remembered once Lee Hsien Loong was third in his class. Lee Kuan Yew was not satisfied with the result and called his son to his room. Then Lee Hsien Loong was frightened, Lee Kuan Yew told his son to get first next time.

Since then Lee Hsien Loong would get first almost every time. Lee Kuan Yew was equally strict with his daughter who scored 10As.

Lee Kuan Yew also forbade the nanny to accompany the children to school. When Lee Hsien Loong was in Primary 3, he asked to go to school in the school bus (instead of being driven). At first Yan Kou was concerned Lee Hsien Loong would not be able to keep up with the school bus, but Lee Hsien Loong told her that he would dash to catch the school bus once the school bell rang. Lee Kuan Yew respected Lee Hsien Loong’s decision, and let the children learn to adapt.

No airs

In addition, when the children turned 21, they were expected to be independent. Very often the children would ask the workers to buy stuff for them, Mrs Lee would insist the children pay for it themselves and would not pay on their behalf.

While working for the Lees, Yan Kou would address Lee Kuan Yew as Mr Lee even after he became the prime minister. His children were also very causal, and like their parents, have no airs. The workers would call the children by their names only.

Mr & Mrs Lee liked to drink coffee, eat beef, spicy dishes and curry, but that’s not to the liking of Yan Kou who likes fish and Chinese dishes. So Mrs Lee would let the workers prepare whatever food they liked too.

Yan Kou said working for the Lees, was like staying at home. She only needed to inform the Lees before she went out. Sometime, she also invited her friends to her work place. Mrs Lee treated the workers well. In the past, the employer and employee contributed equal share to the employee’s CPF. The Lees would pay for her share too.

When Yan Kou decided to leave the Lees, Mrs Lee requested for her to stay for some more years. Unfortunately Yan Kou’s sister was in poor health.

Her home town did not have any telephone, but Lee Wei Ling would write to Yan Kou to keep in contact. Lee Wei Ling also sent a photo of the “whole family” to Yan Kou. When Lee Wei Ling’s friend visited China, she would ask her friend to visit Yan Kou on her behalf.

Bad Lee! Bad Lee! Nepotism bad! Democracy good!

http://news.enorth.com.cn/

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Milkiing every bit of goodwill from even an aged family helper will do nothing to change the voter’s need for democracy or the reality of democracy that disallows a feudal style oligarchy of family blocs in Parliament! 2 terms over. GTFO of Parliament all nepotists. Voters in Singapore, know what to do? Which taxpayer wants to keep  paying that 4+ million salary of UN illegal posts? MM? SM? B.S. . . . democracy is the last thing Singapore is. ‘Google’ Nepotism images and the first person that appears will be LKY’s term limitless MP oligarch family.

10 Articles on Malaysian Politics : Spying, Neurotech or Occultism?, A Potential 3rd Forcer MP Candidate, More NGO Flounder, A Potential Neurotech Cover Up, Best Practices while being Racist does not a Nation make, Nepotistic DAP needs more democracy and less posing – Attacking Strawmen does nothing to end APARTHEID, Strawman for the Strawmen to Misdirect from the REAL ISSUE – APARTHEID, EU Ambivalence or More Collusion? – reposted by @AgreeToDisagree – 11th May 2012

In 1% tricks and traps, 3rd Force, advice, Apartheid, Malaysia, Nepotism, neurolinguistics, Neurotech, unprofessional behaviour on May 11, 2012 at 9:20 am

ARTICLE 1

Singapore expats say assaulted by bodyguards of Malaysian royalty – by Shannon Teoh – May 09, 2012

An aerial view of Pulau Rawa. — malaysia-islands.com pic
KUALA LUMPUR, May 9 — Four Singapore-based expatriates have alleged that they were attacked by bodyguards of a Malaysian royal family while on holiday at a Johor island.

Singapore’s The Straits Times reported today that the men were “brutally assaulted” within hours of arriving at Alang’s Rawa resort on Pulau Rawa, the second attack in seven years on the island with alleged links to Malaysian royalty.

According to the daily, the attack at the resort island off Mersing left a 28-year-old British man covered with injuries and his German friend in intensive care with bleeding in his brain.

“They grabbed my arm, surrounded me, and kicked me in my genitalia to disable me first, then the onslaught just happened,” the man, who spoke on condition of anonymity, was quoted as saying by The Straits Times.

The holidaymaker said he and his three friends, all in their 20s, were having dinner on Friday night when the Malaysian VIP arrived with “a lot of security” and “they started playing hip-hop music.”

According to the newspaper, the two victims were invited over for drinks including shots of tequila with the VIP, also in his 20s, and his cousin.

“He was friendly all along and showed no hostility at all. My friend was in mid-conversation with the VIP and his cousin when this aggressive-looking guy just slapped him out of nowhere.

“I don’t know what the nature of the conversation was, I was at the other end of the table, but there was something that was said that wasn’t ‘correct’,” he said.

According to the Brit, the German was followed to the bathroom by the bodyguards.

“I went to see what was going on, but got pushed out of the bathroom. I don’t know what happened in there, but he ran out like a bullet… through the bar and out onto the beach then into the forested area, and they chased him down,” he said.

He added that the remaining men then turned on him before he dashed into the sea, swimming back to shore only after the attackers had left.

He said he then returned to his room and alerted his other friends, but the attackers had caught up with the German man on another part of the island.

According to the newspaper, the group were asked to leave the island the next morning but not before they had settled their bills for the drinks and lodging.

“We were warned by a European lady working there that it was no longer safe. A boat was arranged for us in 10 minutes and we just left,” the Brit said.

The Straits Times also reported that although Alang’s Rawa confirmed that the victim and his friends were guests there, operations manager Fairus Ahmad denied the account, as did the manager of Rawa Safaris, the only other resort on the island.

“We have checked with all staff and management and they have confirmed that they do not know of any incident either,” Fairus was quoted as saying.

The newspaper reported that back in Singapore, the German man was placed in intensive care with bleeding in his brain and was moved to a normal ward yesterday.

In 2005, a group of six men, allegedly including a Johor prince, gate-crashed a Brazilian couple’s wedding at Pulau Rawa and attacked wedding guests with golf clubs and sharp objects.

Police detained four men, including a member of the Johor royal family in his 20s, but freed all of them on bail a few days later.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

‘ . . . but he ran out like a bullet… through the bar and out onto the beach then into the forested area, and they chased him down,” he said.’

Neurotech recording or neurotech manipulation which was detected possibly caused the offense. The Royals are abit of MI6 as well, and would seem to be versed in Neurotech or even Spiritual techniques most Western upper echelon spies appear to be training in. The German and Brits were spies probably innocuously posing as tourists. The ‘brain injuries’ were not incidental and would indicate this ‘Mind Combat’ situation where the presence of ‘weapons’ (of the mind) in presence of the rulers was retaliated against. Know why the running out to the forest occurred? Perhaps to dispose of neurotech or allow (if spiritual) the ‘attacking spirit’ to escape. Conversely the entire incident was a sandiwara to snare interested conspiracy theorists or occultists into sending their thoughts in the direction of the conspirators who cooked up a story. 3 versions! Whichever is true will be applicable.

ARTICLE 2

Has Malaysia become a Police State? – by Tommy Thomas – July 7, 2011 – http://www.malaysianbar.org.my

Death threats. Bomb threats. Warning on revocation of citizenship. Preventive detention. Arrest of hundreds for wearing Yellow T-shirts. Banning of organisations. Prohibition of peaceful marches.

Is one describing Burma? Or Zimbabwe? No, this is Malaysia in July 2011, in its 54th year of independence. Has paranoia gripped the decision-making elite in Kuala Lumpur?

But for its grave repercussions, one would have to laugh at the disproportionate overreaction and incompetence of government agencies in recent weeks.  Has Malaysia become a police state, with no place for the rule of law? So what is the problem that has attracted the ugly, heavy hand of the executive.

It is only a call by ordinary voices for electoral reform so that future elections are conducted freely and fairly, that is, on a level playing field, with no political party or candidate having an in-built advantage over its rival parties and candidates, very much, like all runners in a 100 metre race starting at the same point with the same distance to run.

Is that not a laudable objective that should receive the support of everyone who truly believes in the democratic process?

When Malaya achieved Merdeka in 1957, it chose the parliamentary democracy style of government under a constitutional monarchy, with the Federal Constitution as the supreme law.

In order to elect a government, general elections are to be held at least one in every five years under the supervision of what was intended to be an independent, impartial Elections Commission to act as a neutral referee or umpire in electoral contests.

In the actual conduct of general and by-elections since 1957, the Election Commission has failed. The actions of governmental agencies such as widespread gerrymandering of constituencies, the domination by one political party of television, radio and print media, a brief campaign period of between 7 to 10 days, the granting of gifts, money and other benefits to voters, have resulted in the ruling coalition having a tremendously unfair advantage whenever elections are held.

It is against this background that BERSIH, a coalition of organisations interested in electoral reform, announced its decision to organise a peaceful march in the streets of Kuala Lumpur on Saturday, July 9, 2011 to call public attention to the ills of the electoral system, and to present a memorandum to the Agong.

Is the Government seriously contending that as a sovereign nation which has enjoyed over five decades of independence, Malaysia cannot tolerate or survive the exercise by thousands of its citizens of their entrenched fundamental liberties of free speech, assembly and association on a Saturday afternoon!

It must be recalled that in the 12-year sunset period of British imperialism over Malaya from 1945 to 1957, the British colonial rulers permitted the holding of public rallies which were brilliantly exploited, first by UMNO in 1946 in leading the opposition to the Malayan Union proposal, and subsequently by the Alliance coalition from 1954 to 1957 in its campaign for Merdeka.

Bearing in mind that those rallies, marches, demonstrations and assemblies were held during the Emergency declared to fight the Communist insurrection, and would result in the ending of colonial rule, the British Government did not ban such rallies, even if it was in its self-interest to do so.

For Merdeka to be meaningful, surely every Malaysian must enjoy greater and better rights in independent Malaysia in 2011 than his or her forefather enjoyed under colonial rule in 1946!

Demonising BERSIH and its outstanding leader of courage and conviction, Ambiga Sreenevasan brings great discredit to the government. It smacks of a witch hunt, McCarthy style.

For the Prime Minister to describe Ambiga Sreenevasan as being anti-Islam shows his true commitment to his own 1Malaysia philosophy – it is just window-dressing!!

I know of no law in Malaysia which prohibits a person from wearing yellow clothes. Thus, there is no Colours Act or Clothes Act under our law which empowers the police from arresting persons because of the choice of garment colour.  Even totalitarian North Korea does not act in such a high-handed, mean and petty way.

When the streets of Kuala Lumpur are no longer safe with the massive increase of crime, and an apparent breakdown of law and order, the Police are allocating their resources to preventing ordinary law-abiding Malaysians from exercising their constitutional rights of free speech, assembly and association.

Compounding its mishandling of the entire situation was the abdication by the elected Government of resolving the problem, apart from a crude outright ban against BERSIH.

For His Majesty, the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, as constitutional monarch, to enter the political fray – probably unprecedented in 54 years – is an indictment of poor governance by the Najib administration. The Prime Minister is elected to lead – what has been displayed hitherto has been dithering leadership reminiscent of the Badawi administration.

The fascist elements of the state, whose main aim in life seems to be to protect and serve the interests of the ruling party, must be reminded that Malaysia does not belong to the Prime Minister.

Neither does the nation belong to the political party that happened to win the most seats in the last Parliamentary election in March 2008 thereby forming the government of the day.

Just as the electorate gave it a mandate to rule temporarily, it can withdraw that mandate at the next general elections which must, by law, be called by mid-2013.  No political party has a divine right to rule continuously. Malaysia, on the contrary, belongs to the people, whose interests may often not coincide with that of the ruling party.

Not allowing the people of Malaysia to express their opinion on a matter of vital public interest, viz, the electoral system, by assembling peacefully in Kuala Lumpur is wholly unacceptable. It is neither right nor proper.

The behavior of our leaders indicate that they are desperate to hold on to power by all means, and every measure must be taken by the state to prevent what they perceive as a threat to their own position.

It is an iron law of history that besieged, desperate leaders who believe they are indispensible or identify themselves with their countries ultimately lose power : it is always only a matter of time.

I urge my fellow Malaysians to attend the rally on Saturday in droves, and to behave in a peaceful, civilised manner with a single-minded focus on calling for a reform of the badly marred electoral system so structured in favour of one party.

Malaysians must, with pride and dignity, exercise their fundamental rights of free speech, association and assembly on 9th July 2011 so that the executive branch of government can be shown to have totally underestimated the good sense of the people.

The shameful conduct of Malaysian politicians and bureaucrats in the past weeks must be wiped clean by the actions of the citizenry on Saturday. See you there.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

If Tommy Thomas is ready to head a Malaysian Delegation to UN and NAM or BRICs as well for the below 3 items :

1) Freedom from Apartheid/Fascism (Article 1 Human Rights Charter)
2) Freedom from Religious-Persecution/Religious-Supremacy. (Article 18 Human Rights Charter)
3) Equality for all ethnicities and faiths in all aspects of policy, Law and Constitution. (Surah An Nisa 4:75)

We should vote for Tommy Thomas under a 66.6% quorum for CM as an independent candidate in Penang’s most important constituency at once (with an intent to modify the Malaysian constitution to allow a True Democracy form one-man-one-vote system as to the PM, DPM’s, EXCO, MP and Assemblymen posts similar to the USA’s Presidential vote.

CM Lim Guan Eng is too much of a CEO wannabe that joined politics for profit (evidenced by the 750K funeral request from  BN – of all people) on the back of an undemocratic, term limitless and nepotistic, also abusive DAP political culture, doubtless afflicted by PAP affiliation, and only is CM by virtue of cult of personality father Lim Kit Siang. A detestably undemocratic and 3rd world-like situation not much better than BN’s similar situations.

Tommy Thomas, ready to be CM of Penang? We need EDUCATED people in politics not ‘Daddy-Anak’ b.s. in too much of the Dewan.

ARTICLE 3

The truth about migrants in Malaysia: AND IT’S NOT PRETTY! – by Director Irene Fernandez – Wednesday, 09 May 2012 21:47

“Whereas recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world..”: that is the first sentence in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

As a member of the United Nations, Malaysia has proclaimed to hold this Declaration to the highest standards, to protect & promote respect for these rights and freedoms, and to actively secure effective recognition of these rights for all persons. “Inherent, universal, inalienable rights” applies, of course, to migrant workers too. It applies to all 2.6 million migrant workers in Malaysia. This is a basic premise that we call on the Malaysian government to accept. Should they not, we ask them, as members of the international community, to explain why.

These discussions of fundamental rights and dignity of all persons, all workers, including all migrant workers must be had openly, frankly and publicly in Malaysia. Tenaganita, has consistently and loudly voiced deep concerns over the inherent and critical problems in the system of recruitment and employment of migrant workers in Malaysia, and of many aspects of Malaysia’s immigration policies that are in harsh violation of fundamental rights and that restricts access to justice. The tragedy is that we have raised these issues (backed by civil society and unions, nationally and internationally) for the past 2 decades, without seeing much in the way of the Malaysian government actively making significant changes to the system in order to protect the rights of migrant workers. The State has unfortunately found it more useful to attack the news-bearer. Does shooting the messenger change the facts on the ground?

Fact: Approximately one out of three workers in Malaysia is a migrant worker. Labour policies therefore have wide reaching consequences on the rights of workers in Malaysia where a significant number of workers are open to exploitation, abuse and violence reflecting modern day forms of slavery.

Fact: Two countries within ASEAN, Indonesia and Cambodia, have frozen the recruitment and placement of domestic workers from their country to Malaysia.

It is understood that that is in response to numerous reports of serious rights abuses against domestic workers here in Malaysia. The Malaysian government, however, remains numb to action, and has not brought about any form of comprehensive legal mechanism to actively protect and promote the rights of domestic workers (who also have inalienable rights). When the majority of countries at the International Labour Organisation (of which Malaysia is a member to) voted in resounding support for the Domestic Workers Convention (known as ILO Convention 189) Malaysia abstained (despite having over 200, 000 domestic workers currently in the country and active plans to recruit more). Is this a reflection of the State’s position that it does not want to recognize nor actively protect the fundamental rights of domestic workers?

Fact: In the latest Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between Malaysia and Indonesia on domestic workers, there are escape clauses built in that once more place the domestic worker in a vulnerable state.

The Malaysian government did agree to a separate bank account for domestic workers, one-day off a week, and for passports to be kept with the worker herself. There are, however, follow up clauses which state that the one-day off can be converted into “overtime” and passports can be kept for ”safe keeping” by the employer. It is like the right hand gives and the left hand takes it away. The rights to rest and to hold one’s passport disappears. Article 24 of the UDHR states “everyone has the right to rest and leisure, including reasonable limitation of working hours and periodic holidays with pay”. Why is there resistance on the part of the Malaysian government to not do everything in its power to ensure that the full enjoyment of those rights for domestic workers as spelled out in Article 24 are protected and promoted?

Fact: Four years ago, Tenaganita and the Malaysian Bar, along with several other members of civil society, submitted a memorandum to the Malaysian government which consisted of a comprehensive policy on the recruitment, placement and employment of and model contract for migrant workers in Malaysia.

The comprehensive policy would be the basic framework for the development of laws and mechanisms to actively protect and promote the rights of migrant workers in the country. This open and direct call for this policy was made to the State in recognition of the widespread and serious human rights violations against migrants in Malaysia. Four years later, the Malaysian government has still yet to respond to this call from civil society and the Malaysian Bar.

We have instead seen increased measures to institutionalize practices that have crippled the rights and dignity of migrants. One such example is the amendments made to the Employment Act in December 2011 to also define “outsourcing companies” and “labour contractors” as “employers”. Outsourcing companies and labour contractors have been key factors in the trafficking of persons for labour in Malaysia, a fact that the State is aware of. The State also pushed through this amendment in spite of strong protests from Unions and civil society. This is a classic case of failed governance to address human trafficking and to protect the human rights of workers.

Fact: In 2011, Tenaganita handled the cases of 453 migrants in Malaysia, who were predominantly victims of labour trafficking, including migrant workers, refugees and domestic workers. The top key violations were: unpaid wages; arrest, detention & deportation; denial of days of rest; overtime wages not paid; absence of a contract signed between the employer and the employee.

These forms of violations reflect both the abuse of labour rights and the state of ‘forced labour’ that these migrants were in while in Malaysia. These forms of violations are also not random acts by abusive employers. The non-recognition of domestic workers in the Employment Act, the widespread abuses by outsourcing companies, the non-recognition of the rights of refugees to work, the denial of undocumented workers to access redress (regardless of how they became undocumented), the sluggish actions by the State to actively prevent human trafficking, abuse, violence – all these realities converge in a hot, bubbling cauldron of human rights abuses that migrants are thrown into.

Dismissing these cases as ‘isolated incidences’ does not change the reality. A State that proclaims to respect human rights would understand that these cases warrant urgent and immediate actions to address the laws, policies and practices by the State that create an environment for these cases.

Fact: Migrants access to redress and justice is debilitated under existing legislation and practices by the State where the right to stay and the right to work have been denied.

Firstly, in order to remain legally in Malaysia, migrant workers are required to have valid passports and work permits. The Immigration Act, however, gives full power to the “employer” to obtain, renew and cancel the work permit, while punishing the migrant for any violations of the work permit. This is clearly problematic when migrants seek to take cases against their employers, as their employers can (and commonly do) react by cancelling the work permit thereby rendering the migrant ‘undocumented’ and subject to arrest, detention, whipping (if they are male) and deportation.

The Immigration Act does have an allowance for workers to apply for a ‘special pass’, at the cost of RM100 per month, and it can only be renewed three times. If the case is not resolved within these 3 months, the migrant worker must return home.

Tenaganita’s experience during the past 15 years shows that due process takes more than 6 months, sometimes up to 6 years before a case is resolved. While the case is being investigated and brought to court for hearings, the worker is not allowed to work. The policy framework thus denies the worker’s right to stay to get redress and denies the worker’s right to work to support him/herself (and pay for the special pass) while the case is in court. On the other hand, Malaysian workers can continue to work while waiting for a resolution to their complaint (as rightly so). Such a policy thus not only denies the migrant worker due process but it is also discriminatory against migrants.

Furthermore, responses by enforcement departments to migrant cases filed with them are more often than not poor. Tenaganita files a police report in all cases that involves the withholding of passports of the workers by employers. This is done because the withholding of the passport belonging to someone else is a serious offence under the Passport Act and without their passport, the migrant worker faces threats to their security in the form of arrest, detention, whipping and deportation. Without their passports, and facing these very real threats, migrants find it extremely difficult to leave their employers and seek justice. In many instances, this puts the migrant in a state of forced labour. Despite the seriousness of this, the police, however, do not act on these police reports. In some instances, they have told the migrants to “file complains in the Small Claims Tribunal”. This lackadaisical attitude by enforcement officers towards the human security of migrants and the acceptance of this criminal act by employers should not be taken lightly by any quarters of the State.

Fact: Domestic workers defined as domestic servants meanwhile cannot seek redress for violation of rights except to claim for unpaid wages under the Employment Act simply because their rights are not recognized in the Act. The First Schedule of the Employment Act, under Employee (5) states “ he is engaged as a ‘domestic servant’ – provisions section 12, 14, 16, 22, 61 and 64 and Parts IX, XII and XIIA are not applicable”. The Minister has the powers to withdraw these exclusions and bring about equal treatment to domestic workers without making reforms to the Employment Act.

Why has the Minister of Human Resources not made the decisions to repeal the clause in the First Schedule, even when doing so would keep with the State’s commitments to respect, promote and defend the rights spelled out in the UDHR, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination (CEDAW) and especially in General Recommendation 26 of CEDAW?

The above policies and practices by the State therefore increases the risk of human rights abuses against migrants, inhibits the migrants access to justice and allows employers of migrant workers to act with impunity.

Fact: When the registration into the biometric system through the 6P programme ended on August 31, 2011, the Minister of Home Affairs announced that 2.6 million migrant workers had come forward and registered. Out of this figure, half of this population (1.3 million workers) were undocumented.

In spite of the overwhelming response by undocumented workers to legalise their status, when the 6P ended on April 10, 2012, the Home Ministry revealed that by February of 2012, 94, 856 workers had opted to return home while about 300,000 had applied for work permits. Our question is: what has happened to the almost 1 million undocumented migrants who had registered and wanted to be legalized? Have the 340 government-approved agents submitted the applications or have the workers been cheated? We want answers from the Home Minister.

Malaysia as a member of ASEAN, has put the spanner in the works and derailed the development of the action plan on migrant workers because it has not accepted the term “migrant workers”. The term ‘migrant workers’ should not be controversial or disputed; it is globally recognized and defined in the UN and ILO Conventions.

This petty objection is symptomatic of a larger, more critical problem in Malaysia: the refusal of the State to recognize neither the basic rights of undocumented workers nor the rights of families of migrant workers. While these rights are defined in the UDHR, the Convention to End All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) and the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), all of which Malaysia is a party to, it is critical that these rights are explicitly spelled out in regards to migrant workers so as to ensure more effective protection. Malaysia however continues to be the stumbling block to the development of an effective action plan for the promotion and protection of rights of mobile populations within ASEAN.

The challenge to this government and the political leadership is to not be arrogant but redeem itself with humility to the feedback from us, from civil society, from unions, from governments of source countries and from international institutions to ensure that we, as a nation, reach global standards in the protection of rights. We call on the Malaysian government to respond openly to this challenge.

We call on the Malaysian government, as members of the ILO, to begin this positive response by signing onto (and implementing) the various conventions that ensure decent work and decent wages for all workers, both migrant and Malaysian.

Today, in the 21st century, Malaysia has created an underclass of workers called migrant workers who are open to extreme forms of exploitation that reflects modern day slavery. Will the Malaysian government work with us to stop us from hurtling further in this direction, and collaboratively create an environment that respects, protects, promotes and defends the rights and dignity of all workers, including migrant workers?

Dr Irene Fernandez is the Executive Director of Tenaganita

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

BERSIH is bad enough, and here we have Tenaganita which is a watered down BERSIH IMHO equally useless where at least  BERSIH had capacity for violence (though violence should be a last resort thing – i.e. if Ambiga was dying in prison and the protestors wanted to save Ambiga then would some kind of riot be appropriate . . . ). What useless platitudes Irene spouts! Talking about migrants when normal citizens are suffering apartheid and disenfranchisement?

Is Irene from APARTHEID IGNORING Pakatan, or fronting for RACIST BN when NORMAL citizens do not even have :

1) Freedom from Apartheid/Fascism (Article 1 Human Rights Charter)
2) Freedom from Religious-Persecution/Religious-Supremacy. (Article 18 Human Rights Charter)
3) Equality for all ethnicities and faiths in all aspects of policy, Law and Constitution. (Surah An Nisa 4:75)

File lawsuits against all racists or political parties  non-compliant with the Human Rights Charter or use the below response to ‘Article 9’ to remove the racist MPs from government.

Otherwise disband Tenaganita or give up that Executive Director’s post. Neither Executing nor Directing. Don’t you dare ignore APARTHEID against the minorities while going all nice and fuzzy on MIGRANTS.

We are a nation divided as all laws and constitution stands, and Irene talks about migrants! File that lawsuit already!

I’ll tell you and everyone what TRULY is not pretty – CMs of Penang, Executive Directors of Tenaganitas, and Leaders of BERSIHs IGNORING APARTHEID and talking about migrants or rioting or sending ‘pork to Muslims instead . . . File that lawsuit at UN, NAM, BRICS or the International Criminal Court at Hague to end APARTHEID in Malaysia already!

ARTICLE 4

NGOs, parties say Irene Fernandez has tarnished nation’s image – May 09, 2012

KUALA LUMPUR, May 9 — A number of non-governmental organisations and political parties today slammed Tenaganita executive director Irene Fernandez for tarnishing Malaysia’s image through the Indonesian media.

They also called on the government and police to take stern action against Fernandez including closing Tenaganita, as it could continue to be a virus that hurts Malaysia’s reputation.

The NGOs and political parties concerned also demanded that Fernandez retract her statement about labour conditions in the country and apologise to Malaysians. — Reuters file pic
Ikatan Rakyat Insan Muslim Malaysia (IRIMM), Amir Amsaa Alla Pitchay said Fernandez’s action was that of a traitor to the country as it could adversely affect Malaysia-Indonesia relations.

“If you want to criticise your own country that way, better not stay in Malaysia and not even eat here,” he said at a press conference, which was also attended by representatives of Dewan Ekonomi dan Sosial Muslim Malaysia (DESMMA), Pertubuhan Kebajikan dan Dakwah Islamiah Malaysia (Pekida), Ampang branch of the People’s Progressive Party (PPP) and MIC Wangsa Maju division.

The Jakarta Post had on Monday reported that Fernandez claimed, among others, Malaysia was not safe for Indonesian workers because it did not have a legal framework or specific law to protect migrant workers.

She was also reported to have said that it was not in the Royal Malaysian Police’s power to shoot three Indonesian nationals who were house-breaking and robbery suspects in an incident in Port Dickson recently.

DESMMA president, Mohd Fazil Abdullah said Fernandez was more willing to run down her own country than feeling proud of having a peaceful country like Malaysia.

“More than two million Indonesians work in Malaysia and if the problems mentioned by her are so serious, they would not continue to come here to earn a living.

“Malaysia is still a peaceful place to earn a living compared to some other countries. If there are problems, they should not be blown out of proportion because she (Fernandez) should investigate first.

“Don’t simply make accusations because the number of problematic Indonesian workers is small,” he said.

Mohd Fazil regards Fernandez as being ungrateful for making such allegations against the Malaysian police as they have kept the country peaceful for more than 200 years, and she herself had benefited from a safe environment due to a police presence in the past.

The NGOs and political parties present at the press conference also demanded that Fernandez retract her statement and to apologise to Malaysians. — Bernama

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Irene should just include ALL of the above groups and persons in that lawsuit as well. Stop addressing non-issues Irene. Or would Irene like to hand over that Executve Director’s post to someone more capable.

ARTICLE 5

Owner of killer dog could face charges, says MPSJ – May 09, 2012

KUALA LUMPUR, May 9 — The owner of a pit bull, which attacked and killed a septuagenarian in Subang Jaya yesterday, can be prosecuted despite the canine having a licence.

Subang Jaya Municipal Council (MPSJ) deputy corporate director Azfarizal Abdul Rashid said, although the dog had a licence, the onus was on its owner to abide by the conditions imposed by MPSJ.

The conditions come under the MPSJ Law on Licensing of Dogs and Dog Breeding House 2012.

“Among others, owners cannot allow dogs to go free but must put them on a leash and under control when outside their premises,” Azfarizal said in a statement today.

He said, if the owners were found to be negligent, they could be compounded for RM1,000 and the dogs seized.

Azfarizal said the dog involved in the fatal attack has been seized by the Selangor Veterinary Services Department to facilitate investigations.

Yesterday, Yip Sun Wah, 74, was jogging when he was attacked by a male pit bull belonging to a neighbour on Jalan 19/5E, SS19 Subang Jaya. Yip died on the spot. — Bernama

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Here’s a draft for a law that any legislators of any country could use in this sort of case. The punishment (unless neurotech is involved) should be neither fine nor jail term BUT for the owner of the offending animal to :

a) provide for an equal number of persons or years of life lost (to the victim replace with ‘Care Provision’ from such attacks or persons in equally debilitating conditions)
i) for this case the septuagenerian probably had 10-20 years of life to live so punishment of care provision should be 10-20 years as well
ii) younger persons dying would make the owner liable to several decades worth of care provision
iii) with next of kin liable if the offending owner dies before the ‘care provision period’ is completed :

b) the animal is not to be put down
i) because the natural instinct is not the animal’s fault – in wild animals do hunt for food (geezer here is just food, there is no way to pre-educate as of this day)
ii) if the animal has been witnessed to have been verbally goaded or attacked by the victim (alive or not)

This sort of law should make owners of naturally vicious dogs that might kill be very careful as next of kin, nearest relative, even distant relative would become liable to provision of care for surviving persons. Again this is not about money or imprisonment and enriching prison contractors.

ARTICLE 6

Indonesia’s complex political landscape, and why we should be aware of it — Farish A. Noor – May 09, 2012

MAY 9 — I write this with a heavy heart, for yet again I am convinced that I suffer from the Cassandra complex. That is, being in a position to see what might happen in the near future but not having anyone listen to me and to end up being summarily dismissed as a worrisome bore instead.

I am sad because yet another row has emerged between Malaysia and Indonesia, and once again ties are strained over the issue of foreign workers in Malaysia. I am sad because, yet again, I see Southeast Asian citizens falling back into the neatly demarcated enclaves of national identities and forgetting the simple fact that the region was once a criss-crossing overlapping patchwork of communities that were perhaps less divided than they are today.

I am sad because, yet again, I see narrow nationalism overcoming regionalism, and countries trying to score points at each others’ expense.

The backdrop to this is the recent controversy about statements made by Malaysian activists about working conditions of workers in the country. Complicating matters is the fact that the statement/s were taken up by the Indonesian media, given some coverage, exploited perhaps by some parties, and eventually leading to investigations — rather than dealing with the real issue of workers lives and rights.

I will not comment on the personalities involved here, but I wish to make some observations about the state of Indonesian politics at the present that may be useful for some people.

Firstly, many of us simply do not understand and realise how complex and plural Indonesian politics has become in the post-Suharto era, where the country can be said to be going through a period of ‘hyper-democracy’, with the proliferation of so many new parties.

Gone are the days of Suharto where Indonesian politics was made up of three major parties — Golkar, PDI, PPP — and where government-to-government relations were handled on the elite level.

Suharto’s demise has also led to the weakening of the formerly dominant Golkar party, opening up new opportunity structures for new aspiring political entrepreneurs and wannabe elites who see party membership as a means for upward social-economic mobility.

Secondly, Indonesia has also experienced radical changes in terms of the relationship between the formerly powerful centre and the periphery. If during Suharto’s era the country was predominantly centrist in its organisation, Indonesia today has experienced a steady process of decentralisation since the era of Megawati.

Local elections, proportional representation (at party candidature level), local ordinances, etc have shifted power from Jakarta to the outer island provinces as never before, lending the impression that there is no longer a singular Indonesia focused on Jakarta, but rather many competing centres of power.

Thirdly, with the opening up of civil society and democratic space, and with the rise of local politics and political entrepreneurialism, politics has saturated all levels of Indonesian society in a myriad of ways, most noticeably in the domain of NGOs and CSOs. Compounding matters is the blurring of the distinction between NGOs, CSOs and political parties — many of which support each other and are mutually dependent.

Fourthly, in the present climate of an Indonesia undergoing rapid and visible transformation, one salient feature seems to be the relative absence of ideological contention between the parties, NGOs and CSOs. Many of the new social movements and parties in the country foreground a broad nationalist agenda, and quite a few of them articulate a vision of a dominant, powerful and even aggressive Indonesia vis-a-vis the rest of Asean.

It is against this context that groups like the hyper-nationalist Laskar Merah Putih and other groups have emerged, calling upon Indonesia to be more aggressive towards other countries. Over the years as I watched Indonesia’s political centre move slowly to the right, such developments alarm me due to their populist nature and their capacity to mobilise crowds against the perceived threat of outsiders and “enemies”. Malaysia has become the punching bag of some of these groups, and attacks on the Malaysian embassy have grown more frequent, and dramatic in their symbolism.

Here it has to be emphasised that many ordinary Indonesians are unaware of the fact that the Malaysian media and civil society has not followed the same path as theirs. My Indonesian friends and students are often surprised when I tell them that Malaysians generally do not attack the Indonesian embassy in KL.

It also has to be stated categorically that despite the tone and tenor of the more radical anti-Malaysian groups in Indonesia, thus far not a single Malaysian has been assaulted or injured in any way, and that the level of hostility thus far is largely symbolic, and confined to the extreme right-wing fringe of the political spectrum only.

Now it is with these factors in mind that my own stand on the question of foreign workers in Malaysia has been a nuanced and calculated one. Often, I have been asked by students and activists in Indonesia about the state of foreign workers in the country.

My response can be summarised as follows:

1. While host countries are obliged to protect the rights of foreign workers in their country, they are, I feel, obliged to protect the rights of their local workers too. It is unfair to simply criticise the host country if the Indonesian government does little to secure the rights of their own workers abroad.

2. While some of these Indonesian NGOs are so vocal about the abuse of workers in foreign countries including Dubai, the UAE, etc., why is it that they remain relatively silent about the poor working conditions of Indonesian workers at home? And if so, whose agendas are they really serving?

3. And if these Indonesian NGOs are so concerned about how workers are being cheated by employment agencies in foreign countries, why are they relatively silent about the cheating that takes place in Indonesia, by the recruitment agencies there?

It is for this reason that I am weary and wary of compounding matters further, and of unwittingly aiding the extreme right-wing hyper-nationalists in Indonesia by taking sides in any argument. My deepest worry is that with the rise of hyper-nationalism all across Southeast Asia today, in so many Asean countries, my longing to see the emergence of a peoples’ Asean that is bound by people-to-people contact fades further into the distance.

Asean will undoubtedly face its most challenging decade yet, and the economic, political and structural pressures on all the countries of the region will grow.

The only way that Asean can get through this in one piece is if and when the leaders and communities of Asean realise that we are one region that has a common destiny, and that we need to foster the centripetal (rather than centrifugal) forces in the region.

This latest development has dashed my hopes yet again, and I feel that the dream of an Asean decade and an Asean future more distant than ever. Worst of all, it reinforces my suspicion that despite our common historical past and geographical proximity, we remain alien to each other.

Now will someone — anyone — please heed my advice, and create a Malaysia-Indonesia Friendship Society?

* Dr Farish A. Noor is a Senior Fellow at the Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.

* This is the personal opinion of the writer or publication and does not necessarily represent the views of The Malaysian Insider

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

1) I write this with a heavy heart, for yet again I am convinced that I suffer from the Cassandra complex.

Credentials, wealth, position and network all make Farish suitable to run for private candidacy. Instead of running for election Farish sits on the sidelines talking about ‘Cassandra’. GREEEEAAAAAAAT . . . or shall we excuse Farish because Farish is living in a microstate run by the non-merit based, nepotistic PAP?

2) That is, being in a position to see what might happen in the near future but not having anyone listen to me and to end up being summarily dismissed as a worrisome bore instead.

Run for election and stop wallowing in self pity. Or is that not possible because you are a crypto-racist who refuses to challenge the lack of :

1) Freedom from Apartheid/Fascism (Article 1 Human Rights Charter)
2) Freedom from Religious-Persecution/Religious-Supremacy. (Article 18 Human Rights Charter)
3) Equality for all ethnicities and faiths in all aspects of policy, Law and Constitution. (Surah An Nisa 4:75)

Why suffer the faded limelight of online media? What is lacking Farish, except perhaps SINCERITY in intent? Run for candidacy and stop being a faux-reformist propagandist to make BN look abit better from Singapre and feel all mellow and ‘academic’ while wasting the readers’ time. Heavy heart? Caused by the weight of living a life on the backs of the Rakyat without doing the necessary of a REAL academic or intelligensia IMHO. A degree obtained with money and mugging, academic post by pandering does not make anyone an academic, the soul behind the degree holder and the principle behind the work decides that without a single institution or personality backing them.

ARTICLE 7

Yield all business interests to Bumis, Malay chamber tells Putrajaya – b y Shannon Teoh – May 09, 2012

Syed Ali said growing Bumiputera equity was meaningless if it is not accompanied by profits. — File pic
KUALA LUMPUR, May 9 — The country’s biggest Malay business association wants the government to divest all of its lucrative commercial holdings, instead of the current plan to only yield 10 non-core assets to Bumiputera interests.

The Malay Chamber of Commerce Malaysia (MCCM) said today the government’s target for Bumiputeras to hold 30 per cent equity in the economy was meaningless without profits.

Putrajaya insisted yesterday it was confident that the target will be reached by 2020, after it announced last month Bumiputera equity had breached 23 per cent in 2010.

But the MCCM told a press conference today that “equity is one thing, business is another.”

If possible, we want it all. Why should the government hold it?

“Equity is good. But if there is no profit, it is meaningless. If possible, we want it all. Why should the government hold it? Might as well sell it so we can do business,” MCCM president Syed Ali Alattas said, referring to the government’s plan to divest non-core government assets to Bumiputera firms.

Syed Ali cited the example of Thistle Hotel in his hometown of Johor Baru, which “from day one was Malay-owned but (makes) no profit. What’s the point?”

“Better to have 100 RM3 million three-star hotels than a RM300 million hotel that makes no profit,” he said.

Datuk Seri Najib Razak had reaffirmed last month his commitment to a plan for Permodalan Nasional Berhad (PNB) and Khazanah Nasional to each yield five non-core businesses to Bumiputera firms as part of efforts to grow the community’s participation in the economy.

In February, the prime minister announced the that 10 government-linked entities will be divested to “worthy” Bumiputera owners, raising concerns from across the political divide that the move mirrors the failed Mahathir-era plan to groom Bumiputera entrepreneurs in the 1990s.

Last year, Khazanah made a total of eight divestments, which brought in proceeds of RM7.7 billion and helped to push the company’s profit before tax for the full year to RM5.3 billion from RM3 billion in 2010.

Key divestments included the sale of its 32 per cent stake in Pos Malaysia to Tan Sri Syed Mokhtar al-Bukhary’s DRB-Hicom Bhd for RM622.8 million and the complete privatisation of PLUS Bhd through a joint acquisition by UEM Group Bhd and the Employees Provident Fund (EPF).

In January, Khazanah also announced the sale of its 42.7 per cent stake in national carmaker Proton Holdings Bhd to DRB-Hicom, which is controlled by Malaysia’s richest Malay, for RM1.3 billion.

Syed Ali added today that the shifting of non-core businesses to Bumiputeras must “not be based just on whether they have the money but whether they can manage it or not.”

He added that MCCM members were well-placed to take over these activities as its 42 organisations were made up of 10,000 professionals including architects, lawyers, engineers, surveyors and scientists.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Separation of powers at work here. For all the racism (if any) within the MCCM’s ranks, this is a good step towards democraticisation of Malaysian Federal governmemt. How about asking the PM to formally make someone the Finance Minister as well. The situation of a single man holding BOTH PM and Finance Minister’s posts causes conflict of interest no end eevn as apartheid ensures that a nation cannot function as a unit but competing factions.

ARTICLE 8

Guan Eng: How can Hanif be considered ‘neutral’ – Najib is clearly desperate! – Written by  Lim Guan Eng – Thursday, 10 May 2012 11:33

The appointment of former inspector-general of police Tun Mohamad Hanif Omar to head of the independent panel to probe incidents of violence during the Bersih 3.0 rally has raised deep public concerns that the investigation will either be a whitewash of police brutality on peaceful demonstrators, a massive cover-up of the sufferings of the victims or a pretext to justify BN’s wild lies that Bersih 3.0 was a coup d’état attempt.

Hanif, who is now Genting Malaysia Bhd Deputy Chair, had claimed that communist sympathizers were involved in the Bersih 3.0 rally, and supported Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak’s claim that the Bersih 3.0 rally was an attempt to overthrow the government. Hanif further stated that the tactics of using provocateurs to cause the demonstrators to clash with police and to bring children along in the hope they would get injured were tactics learnt from past pro-communist demonstrations.

Najib is clearly desperate

How can Datuk Seri Najib Razak consider Hanif as a “credible, experienced and respectable” individual that ensures its investigation panel is independent and unbiased, when Hanif has adopted such a prejudiced and partisan stand against the Bersih 3.0 rally as an attempt to overthrow the government?

What makes those claims of a coup d’tat by Najib and Hanif most ridiculous is that both of them ignored the fact that six local pressmen and about 12 photographers and journalists from the foreign media were reportedly assaulted during the fracas on April 28 Bersih 3.0 rally by police.

To add insult to injury, Hanif is now heading the investigation panel raising doubts about the integrity, reliability and credibility of its findings. As a former Inspector-General of Police, Hanif is first and foremost disqualified from serving on the investigation panel due to this conflict of interest as the police is being accused. Secondly, by publicly condemning Bersih, Hanif’s prejudiced bias would also disqualify him to serve on the investigation panel. Finally, by linking Bersih to communism, Hanif is still fighting yesterday’s long-concluded wars, making the outcome of these investigations a foregone conclusion.

For these reasons, the Prime Minister should try to salvage or restore some credibility and public confidence as well as renew faith that “justice will not only be done but be seen to be done” by replacing Hanif with an independent, apolitical, unbiased and an upright person of integrity.

Lim Guan Eng is the DAP secretary general and Penang Chief Minister

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

What does attacking Hanif Omar do? NOTHING. Attacking a mere Hanif Omar is a sign of pettiness (also a Freudianslip of sorts, cult of prsonality vs. cult of personality indicating prioritsation of ego rather than actual democratic issues) when LGE could attack the lack of :

1) Freedom from Apartheid/Fascism (Article 1 Human Rights Charter)
2) Freedom from Religious-Persecution/Religious-Supremacy. (Article 18 Human Rights Charter)
3) Equality for all ethnicities and faiths in all aspects of policy, Law and Constitution. (Surah An Nisa 4:75)

;via a formal delegation to UN, NAM, BRICS or even Sunnite Islam’s highest authority, the Al-Azhar Uni at Cairo. The above piece is a sure sign that LGE is NOT CM material at all, lack of logos but probably quite mercenary minded (asks for 750K funerals and very interested in ‘CEO Stuff’). Any blogger full of pathos could attack Hanif Omar or any VIP. Use that undeserved CM’s ethos or GTFO of the Dewan Mr.Parachute beneficiary of nepotism quorumless, unelected CM! DAP fails with sheer inability to even comprehend rhetoric, much less DEMOCRACY to at least know the APARTHEID CM Lim being a minority now lives in! Pitiful and a waste of mandate!

ARTICLE 9

Hanif pledges to be impartial as Bersih 3.0 panel chief – By Shazwan Mustafa Kamal – May 11, 2012

KUALA LUMPUR, May 11 — Tun Mohammad Hanif Omar has maintained he will be fair and impartial when heading Putrajaya’s independent panel on allegations of violence during Bersih 3.0.

The former Inspector-General of Police dismissed allegations that the panel would return biased findings with him on board, saying that he has always acted fairly in previous enquiries and police investigations.

“If they are concerned about unfairness, they can ask themselves whether I was unfair back then,” Hanif told Sinar Harian.

The former Inspector-General of Police’s impartiality has been questioned by PR leaders. — file pic
The former top cop was part of a special committee tasked with investigating the fatal police shooting of 14-year-old Aminulrasyid Amzah two years ago.

“In May 2010, I was part of the special police monitoring panel investigating the sudden death of Aminulrasyid Amzah in Shah Alam… where the panel’s scope involved complaints against the police,” he said.

Hanif said he hoped to be able to carry out his duties professionally and responsibly.

Pakatan Rakyat (PR) leaders have demanded Hanif step down as head of the special panel on Bersih 3.0.

PKR de facto leader Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim said this was necessary to ensure the panel is completely fair and neutral in its investigations into incidents surrounding the April 28 rally.

DAP parliamentary leader Lim Kit Siang said Hanif’s appointment was the “worst” decision the Najib administration had made in three years.

DAP secretary-general Lim Guan Eng said that Hanif had already made clear his opposition to Bersih and his former position as IGP would be a conflict of interest when the panel examines allegations of police brutality.

As such, he said, it was a “forgone conclusion” that the panel would absolve all police personnel from blame over the violent incidents during Bersih 3.0 last month.

Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein announced the names of the six-man panel tasked with investigating allegations of police violence against Bersih 3.0 protesters on April 28.

Apart from Hanif, the other panel members include former Chief Judge of Borneo Tan Sri Steve Shim, Sinar Harian managing director Datuk Hussamuddin Yaacub, Media Chinese International legal adviser Liew Peng Chuan, Petronas corporate affairs senior general manager Datuk Medan Abdullah and Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia psychology Professor Dr Ruszmi Ismail.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak pledged last week that “credible, experienced and respectable” individuals would form the independent panel to investigate alleged acts of violence during Bersih 3.0.

Najib said that he, along with the entire government and members of the public, are keeping a close eye on investigations into the allegations that journalists, both local and foreign, had been roughed up during the rally for free and fair elections.

But Najib has come under fire for his administration’s selection of Hanif to head the panel, even after the latter had agreed with the prime minister’s claim that Bersih 3.0 was an attempt to overthrow the government and even claimed that communist sympathisers were involved in the event.

Chaos reigned on the streets of Kuala Lumpur for over four hours after 3pm on April 28 when police fired tear gas and water cannons and chased protesters down the streets to disperse what had initially begun as a peaceful protest calling for free and fair elections.

The Bar Council has said that its observers found that police brutality at the rally was “magnified” compared to already chaotic scenes during a similar gathering for free and fair elections last July 9.

Six local pressmen and 12 photographers and journalists from the foreign media were reportedly assaulted during the fracas on April 28.

Both local and foreign media groups have condemned the hard-handed tactics used on the media, whom they pointed out were merely doing their job.

Police had begun firing the tear gas and water cannons after some demonstrators breached the barricade in front of Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) and rushed into Dataran Merdeka, which the court had barred the public from entering that particular weekend.

They fired as far as the DBKL premises, which are across Jalan Parlimen, and the move broke up the crowd who fled helter-skelter but police chased them down at Jalan Tun Perak and Jalan Raja Laut.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

DAP parliamentary leader Lim Kit Siang said : ‘Hanif’s appointment was the “worst” decision the Najib administration had made in three years. ‘

No. Most of the UMNO lot are lacking in charisma which most racists here (no guesses who) at least have. But even that charisma or neurotech spying will not be enough considered against the below bottomline 3 items where –

The only good Malay is a . . . fair minded Malay who will address Malaysia’s lack of :

1) Freedom from Apartheid/Fascism (Article 1 Human Rights Charter)
2) Freedom from Religious-Persecution/Religious-Supremacy. (Article 18 Human Rights Charter)
3) Equality for all ethnicities and faiths in all aspects of policy, Law and Constitution. (Surah An Nisa 4:75)

Put aside any cryto-racism and raise the status of Malays to the First World Tun Hanif Omar.

Unkept promises for Local Council Elections, same excuses, near 4 years later . . . try below link’s responses at – http://apanama2020.blogspot.com/2010/11/daps-democracy-in-penang.html

ARTICLE 10

The EU would handle Public Assemblies differently – May 9, 2012 – The EU would handle Public Assemblies differently, says its Ambassador to Malaysia – by Shannon Teoh@www.themalaysianinsider.com

The European Union (EU) is “keenly interested” in Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s reform package but believes the raft of legislative changes must “translate to positive effects on the ground”, says its envoy Vincent Piket.

The EU Ambassador to Malaysia told The Malaysian Insider “EU countries would handle public assemblies differently”, just days after the April 28 BERSIH rally, which has seen loud and growing allegations of Police brutality in the aftermath. Putrajaya has said it will assemble panel to investigate violence against journalists.

“This whole series of laws passed by Parliament — a bit in a rush, maybe — but on the whole, present incremental progress. How these laws implemented on the ground, that is the test of the matter. Do the legal reforms translate to real positive effects on the ground?” Piket said in an interview ahead of Europe Day, which falls today.

He added that “EU countries would probably do things differently, handle public assemblies differently from current law,” referring to the newly-enforced Peaceful Assembly Act 2012.

Najib had announced a slew of reforms in the last year, including the repeal of the controversial Internal Security Act (ISA), forming a parliamentary panel on electoral reforms and a new law he said would allow for freedom of assembly in accordance with “international norms”, the largest set of changes in the country within three years.
The EU Ambassador does not believe Malaysians would accept radical changes.But the changes have been described as cosmetic by civil society and the Opposition, and the April 28 sit-in at Dataran Merdeka was called by BERSIH after the electoral reforms movement said it was disappointed with the findings of the polls committee.

At the rally, Police fired tear gas and water cannon to disperse tens of thousands, chasing them down several streets after some had breached the barricade around the historic square, which the courts had barred the public from entering across the weekend.

Dozens of demonstrators have since recounted how they or other rally-goers were allegedly assaulted by groups of Policemen.

The Human Rights Commission (Suhakam) has also said Police conduct was unacceptable while the Bar Council alleged that police brutality was “magnified” from the previous rally for free and fair elections held last July.

But Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Ismail Omar has said that if Police had not acted to disperse the crowd, an “open battle could have happened and created a more dangerous situation.”

Police have insisted they will investigate all claims “openly and fairly”, but so far have identified over 90 civilian suspects and no policeman yet in the ongoing probe over violence perpetrated by both protestors and enforcers.

However, Piket refused to “pass judgment” but said “what is key is the overall trend.”“If you look at it, where we are now, compared to when I first came, I think there is positive progress that is undeniable in terms of greater space for debate, particularly in digital media,” said the ambassador who took up his post just after the landmark March 2008 election.

He added that the key is “where do we go from here” and noted that the government aims to turn Malaysia into a developed economy by 2020 “but also parallel with political transformation and turn Malaysia into this best democracy in the world.”

“I think it’s doable. I don’t think the Malaysian mentality is for radical change. It is more a country of gradual change, moving forward in consensual manner,” the Dutchman added.

Piket also pointed to Najib’s Global Movement of Moderates, to which British Prime Minister David Cameron had given his full support when he visited Malaysia last month.

“EU leaders feel (the movement) is a good initiative but are now trying to see how we can give it practical shape,” he said.

The 53-year-old, who has been with the EU for 20 years, said that one source of friction is “immigration from non-traditional source countries that puts a test on a society’s ability to integrate non-traditional cultures and religions.”

“It is a transition process, goes hand-in-hand with some friction but we can’t let that friction determine the agenda,” he said.

Malaysia has had to deal with the tension between Malay, Chinese and Indian ethnic groups in the peninsula since independence while the flood of migrants from Indonesia and the Philippines has overwhelmed Sabahans.

The Home Ministry embarked on the “6P” amnesty programme last year to either absorb or pardon and repatriate illegal migrant workers as conflicting concerns of labour shortage and the rise of social ills and crime came to a head.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

File that lawsuit against any identified MPs who are racists already! Try the response to ‘Article 9′ on below link to otherwise nail RACISTS and RELIGIOUS SUPREMACISTS in government :

https://malaysiandemocracy.wordpress.com/2012/04/22/5-articles-on-malaysian-politics-malays-waking-up-dpms-platitudes-ignoring-apartheid-daps-platitides-ignoring-apartheid-cm-of-penangs-platitudes-ignoring-apartheid-edging-towards-democracy/

Piket also pointed to Najib’s Global Movement of Moderates, to which British Prime Minister David Cameron had given his full support when he visited Malaysia last month.

Piket is either the most closeted and coddled public personality in the world or just cynically ignoring the fact that Malaysia does not have :

1) Freedom from Apartheid/Fascism (Article 1 Human Rights Charter)
2) Freedom from Religious-Persecution/Religious-Supremacy. (Article 18 Human Rights Charter)
3) Equality for all ethnicities and faiths in all aspects of policy, Law and Constitution. (Surah An Nisa 4:75)

Would Piket kindly speak to PM Najib on Malaysia’s lack of the above 3 items instead of fetting this so-called ‘Global Movement of Moderates’ which the same organizer and Prime Minister of Malaysia has obviously not acted on the 3 items above first? The EU should not stand by and allow people like Picket to speak as if everything is fine, while the 3rd world which merely seeks equality and the above 3 item is denied what even the basics which have already been established by the UNHCR in the 1940s.

‘However, Piket refused to “pass judgment” but said “what is key is the overall trend.”“If you look at it, where we are now, compared to when I first came, I think there is positive progress that is undeniable in terms of greater space for debate, particularly in digital media,” said the ambassador who took up his post just after the landmark March 2008 election.’

Picket’s ambivalence on apartheid when considered against the above FACTS is particularly reprehensible. Will the EU speak honestly and take to task all those who deny anyone the above 3 items?

2 Articles on Nepotism in Malaysia, BN and Pakatan Rakyat – reposted and posted by @AgreeToDisagree – 18 February 2012

In Malaysia, Nepotism, oligarch, oligarchy, political correctness, politics, preventing vested interest, separation of powers on February 18, 2012 at 4:25 pm

ARTICLE 1

Rule of the elite vs rule of the majority: Can Mukhriz “my father’s son” tell the difference – Saturday, 18 February 2012 14:28 – written by  Maclean Patrick, Wong Choon Mei, Malaysia Chronicle

Rule of the elite vs rule of the majority: Can Mukhriz “my father’s son” tell the difference

There is no such thing as an ideal democracy, although many – even Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak – aspires for a “world-class democracy”. Firstly, there is certainly debate as to whose benchmark should one follow.

The American model is normally seen as a template for what a modern democracy should be like, yet it does not take into account allocations for monarchies that reside within the said state. The British model for government is the one Malaysia takes after, where the Monarchy plays a rather ceremonious role, rather than governmental.

Essence of democracy

The fundamentals of democracy manifest themselves in the process thatsignifies it. Democracy is generally defined as a form of government in which all adult citizens have an equal say in the decisions that affect their lives. Ideally, this includes equal (and more or less direct) participation in the proposal, development and passage of legislation into law.

Aristotle’s comment on Democracy is telling: “Now a fundamental principle of the democratic form of constitution is liberty—that is what is usually asserted, implying that only under this constitution do men participate in liberty, for they assert this as the aim of every democracy. But one factor of liberty is to govern and be governed in turn; for the popular principle of justice is to have equality according to number, not worth, and if this is the principle of justice prevailing, the multitude must of necessity be sovereign and the decision of the majority must be final and must constitute justice, for they say that each of the citizens ought to have an equal share; so that it results that in democracies the poor are more powerful than the rich, because there are more of them and whatever is decided by the majority is sovereign. This then is one mark of liberty which all democrats set down as a principle of the constitution. And one is for a man to live as he likes; for they say that this is the function of liberty, inasmuch as to live not as one likes is the life of a man that is a slave. This is the second principle of democracy, and from it has come the claim not to be governed, preferably not by anybody, or failing that, to govern and be governed in turns; and this is the way in which the second principle contributes to egalitarian liberty.”

Rule of the elite when it should be rule of the majority

If rule of majority is in place, as often mentioned by those in Barisan Nasional, then the poor in Malaysia will have a bigger say than those who are rich. Thus, it is right that the government looks into the welfare of the poor and to explain to the poor the abuse of public funds that is so rampant in Malaysia.

But this is not the case in reality. And will never be the case as long as UMNO pulls the strings in BN. The reason is because UMNO practices an oligarchy form of government which is nothing near democracy.

This is evident in the statement by deputy Trade minister Mukhriz Mahathir, the son of Mahathir Mohamad, who recently asserted that all UMNO members should be made to sign a letter swearing that they will remain loyal to the party and work hard to ensure its candidates win in the next general election.

Mukhriz, also the Kedah UMNO deputy liaision committee chairman, said he was proposing the idea following the loyalty oath by delegates at Umno’s annual assembly.

“Making the oath verbally is not enough. We need to put it on paper so that it will be legally binding. Action can be taken against them if they break the oath. “The letter will ensure that there’s no backstabbing or sabotage of party candidates,” Mukhriz had expounded to the press.

You just can’t force people

Now, forcing party members to do something to ensure political survival is oligarchy. Oligarchy is a form of power structure in which power effectively rests with an elite class distinguished by royalty, wealth, family ties, commercial, and/or military legitimacy. Throughout history, most oligarchies have been tyrannical, relying on public servitude to exist.

Having a party member sign a legally binding document contravenes the right of the individual to choose based on their conscience the political party that best serves their interests.

The assertion that having party members be legally wrong for acting against the wises of the party is absurd and goes against the very idea of democracy and the Federal Constitution of Malaysia . Under Article 5 (1), it is stated  ‘No person shall be deprived of his life or personal liberty save in accordance with law’.

My father’s son

What wrong has an UMNO member done if he or she feels that they should not support the stand of the party? By allowing room for a different point of view, yes – even dissension, it is not like giving members room to leave, revolt or act against party. UMNO leaders should have more confidence in their members.

This is something that Mukhriz has failed to understand. The youngest son of former UMNO strongman Mahathir Mohamad, who was regarded as despot by many quarters for his ham fisted rule, Mukhriz said in a recent and rare interview that he was not bothered about being compared to his much reviled dad. Instead, he considered it an honour to be “my father’s son”.

“I am proud of my fathers’ achievements. It’s not for me to deny all that he has done. And I won’t say that I want to get out of my father’s shadow. After all, my name carries the bin (son of) Mahathir…this I cannot change. I’m not bothered if people want to link me with him. It’s a positive link. But if people want to compare me with him, it’s a long shot. I’m still very new compared to my father,” Mukhriz told Bernama.

Following blindly, failing to understand the basics

Now while filial love is to be respected, admired even, to follow blindly is not. At 46, Mukhriz should be young enough to be cognizant of how the world is developing. If he were to deny the growth of Gen Y, and their progressive values, then he is just politicizing in the same mold as his dad.

Whether that means Mukhriz will become a successful and inspiring leader or a feared and corrupt despot is something for his countrymen to decide, but from his recent comments, one has certainly obtained a glimpse of which side he will likely end up on.

One of the most fundamental base of democracy is the liberty of the person, yet this is not what is being practiced within UMNO nor within the governmental structure of Malaysia. It is time that citizens of Malaysia turn the existing and decadent system upside down and practice true democracy – one great factor of liberty is to govern and be governed in turn.

Mahathir never understood it. Neither did UMNO and it looks like Mukhriz won’t either.

Malaysia Chronicle

ARTICLE 2

Rule of the elite vs rule of the majority: Can Lim Guan Eng “my father’s son” tell the difference – Saturday, 18 February 2012 14:28 – edited by @AgreeToDisagree, Malaysian Democracy site

There is no such thing as an ideal democracy, although many – even Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak – aspires for a “world-class democracy”. Firstly, there is certainly debate as to whose benchmark should one follow.

The American model is normally seen as a template for what a modern democracy should be like, yet it does not take into account allocations for monarchies that reside within the said state. The British model for government is the one Malaysia takes after, where the Monarchy plays a rather ceremonious role, rather than governmental.

Essence of democracy

The fundamentals of democracy manifest themselves in the process thatsignifies it. Democracy is generally defined as a form of government in which all adult citizens have an equal say in the decisions that affect their lives. Ideally, this includes equal (and more or less direct) participation in the proposal, development and passage of legislation into law.

Aristotle’s comment on Democracy is telling: “Now a fundamental principle of the democratic form of constitution is liberty—that is what is usually asserted, implying that only under this constitution do men participate in liberty, for they assert this as the aim of every democracy. But one factor of liberty is to govern and be governed in turn; for the popular principle of justice is to have equality according to number, not worth, and if this is the principle of justice prevailing, the multitude must of necessity be sovereign and the decision of the majority must be final and must constitute justice, for they say that each of the citizens ought to have an equal share; so that it results that in democracies the poor are more powerful than the rich, because there are more of them and whatever is decided by the majority is sovereign. This then is one mark of liberty which all democrats set down as a principle of the constitution. And one is for a man to live as he likes; for they say that this is the function of liberty, inasmuch as to live not as one likes is the life of a man that is a slave. This is the second principle of democracy, and from it has come the claim not to be governed, preferably not by anybody, or failing that, to govern and be governed in turns; and this is the way in which the second principle contributes to egalitarian liberty.”

Rule of the elite when it should be rule of the majority

If rule of majority is in place, as often mentioned by those in Barisan Nasional, then the poor in Malaysia will have a bigger say than those who are rich. Thus, it is right that the government looks into the welfare of the poor and to explain to the poor the abuse of public funds that is so rampant in Malaysia.

But this is not the case in reality. And will never be the case as long as DAP pulls the strings in BN. The reason is because DAP practices an oligarchy form of government which is nothing near democracy.

This is evident in the statement by DAP Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng Lim Kit Siang, the son of term limitless Lim Kit Siang, who recently asserted that all DAP members should be made to sign a letter (in the fashion to destroy democracy within the DAP party) swearing that they will remain loyal to the party (in which the central committe is almost entirely held by Lim family clan members) and work hard to ensure its candidates win in the next general election.

Lim Guan Eng, also the Penang Chief Minister (installed as CM by Lim Kit Siang against DAP Penang members resulting in a spate of sackings and quitting members), said he was proposing the idea following the loyalty oath by delegates at DAP’s annual assembly.

“Making the oath verbally is not enough. We need to put it on paper so that it will be legally binding. Action can be taken against them if they break the oath. “The letter will ensure that there’s no backstabbing or sabotage of party candidates,” Lim Guan Eng had expounded to the press. This is ridiculous and UNCONSTITUIONAL, prejudicial to democratic principles and IDIOTIC to suggest at all, but hey when you deal with a 3rd world outfit like DAP, expect the worst.

You just can’t force people

Now, forcing party members to do something to ensure political survival is oligarchy. Oligarchy is a form of power structure in which power effectively rests with an elite class distinguished by royalty, wealth, family ties, commercial, and/or military legitimacy. Throughout history, most oligarchies have been tyrannical, relying on public servitude to exist.

Having a party member sign a legally binding document contravenes the right of the individual to choose based on their conscience the political party that best serves their interests.

The assertion that having party members be legally wrong for acting against the wises of the party is absurd and goes against the very idea of democracy and the Federal Constitution of Malaysia . Under Article 5 (1), it is stated  ‘No person shall be deprived of his life or personal liberty save in accordance with law’.

My father’s son

What wrong has an DAP member done if he or she feels that they should not support the stand of the party? By allowing room for a different point of view, yes – even dissension, it is not like giving members room to leave, revolt or act against party. DAP leaders should have more confidence in their members.

This is something that Lim Guan Eng has failed to understand. The youngest son of former DAP strongman Lim Kit Siang, who was regarded as despot by many quarters for his ham fisted rule, Lim Guan Eng said in a recent and rare interview that he was not bothered about being compared to his much reviled dad. Instead, he considered it an honour to be “my father’s son”.

“I am proud of my fathers’ achievements. It’s not for me to deny all that he has done. And I won’t say that I want to get out of my father’s shadow. After all, my name carries the Lim  surname … this I cannot change. I’m not bothered if people want to link me with him. It’s a positive link. But if people want to compare me with him, it’s a long shot. I’m still very new compared to my father,” Lim Guan Eng told the media.

Following blindly, failing to understand the basics

Now while filial love is to be respected, admired even, to follow blindly is not. At 50, Lim Guan Eng should be young enough to be cognizant of how the world is developing. If he were to deny the growth of Gen Y, and their progressive values, then he is just politicizing in the same mold as his dad Lim Kit Siang.

Whether that means Lim Guan Eng will become a successful and inspiring leader or a hated (not particularly fearful, just the way the racists want – where are those 7 foot tall rippling muscled leaders with lantern jaws – LGE doesn’t inspire anything but general red-tapeness . . . ) and corrupt despot is something for his countrymen to decide, but from his recent comments, one has certainly obtained a glimpse of which side he will likely end up on.

One of the most fundamental base of democracy is the liberty of the person, yet this is not what is being practiced within DAP nor within the governmental structure of Malaysia. It is time that citizens of Malaysia turn the existing and decadent system upside down and practice true democracy – one great factor of liberty is to govern and be governed in turn.

Lim Kit Siang never understood it. Neither did DAP and it looks like Lim Guan Eng won’t either.

Malaysian Democracy

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Not a word yet on one-man one vote Steven?

If there were one-man one-vote elections (one-man one-vote is NOT representative democracy of the ELITE Dewanites, but TRUE democracy of the 99%) I bet that BOTH Lim Guan Eng and Guan ENg’s father Lim Kit Siang wouldn’t even make it into the central committee much less get the Penang CM’s post. Even in the lies about the EXCO Local Elections were too obvious. Try the below link on a massive failure to properly use the people’s mandate :

DAP’s democracy in Penang. – Tuesday, November 16, 2010
http://apanama2020.blogspot.com/2010/11/daps-democracy-in-penang.html

Bribery though with taxpayer funds given to supposedly poor and old, DAP can do. We did not vote DAP for bribes, we voted them to ensure that EXCO elections quorums were met and sufficient time was given for the Rakyat to vote by. Instead we got a false election and now taxpayers are paying for 0.002% quorum sanctioned DAP quangocrats and cronies the taxpayer did not vote for. DAP is a potential trouble maker much like UMNO, voet for 3rd Force instead wherever DAP nepotists stand . . .

The year the government repeatedly changed its mind – Saturday, 31 December 2011 15:35

In 1% tricks and traps, 99%, Democracy, separation of powers, spirit of the law, voting methods on February 5, 2012 at 2:01 pm

KUALA LUMPUR — A growing public demand for accountability forced the government this year to make many about-faces and policy U-turns, characterising what critics would say was a weak administration but supporters might call responsive management.

And voters will get to eventually decide if they want to punish or reward Barisan Nasional (BN) when Datuk Seri Najib Razak calls elections.

The Malaysian Insider reviews some of the year’s notable changes in position and direction.

Bersih 2.0 rally

The first Bersih rally in 2007 was credited with shrinking the ruling coalition’s voter support in Election 2008 that led to Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi’s early exit from government and his successor, Najib, appeared keen to avoid a repeat.

The Najib administration initially moved to nip the problem in the bud by detaining several individuals campaigning for the July 9 rally on suspicion of security risks to King and country and banning T-shirts bearing the images of communists as well as yellow-coloured clothes.

But days before the street march in the capital city, the Yang di-Pertua Agong stepped in to calm the rising storm and the seventh prime minister softened the government’s stance against Bersih 2.0, led by lawyer-activist Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan, and offered the 62-member coalition the use of a stadium of choice for its rally demanding a cleaner and more transparent electoral system.

When the electoral reform movement demanded Stadium Merdeka, Najib said he meant the Shah Alam stadium in Pakatan Rakyat-controlled Selangor, leading to yet another stalemate.

The 72 hours leading to the rally became fuzzy as misinformation reigned.

City police issued a lockdown on the capital and got a court order barring entry to 92 individuals, including the movement’s leaders.

However, videos of harsh police action against the peaceful protestors went viral online and through social media channels such as Facebook and Twitter.

Faced with global criticism, the government conceded it may have mishandled the incident.

PSC electoral reform

On August 15, five weeks after the July 9 rally, Najib announced the set up of a bipartisan Parliamentary Select Committee (PSC) on electoral reform, addressing Bersih 2.0’s eight demands.

But the very next day, Najib’s deputy Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin said the PSC would only fine-tune and not reform the electoral processes. It was not the first time Muhyiddin had voiced a different view from his boss, raising questions of unity within the Najib Cabinet.

The PSC kicked off its public hearings for feedback on November 11, and several recommendations have been made since. The Election Commission has endorsed recommendations like indelible ink for the next general election.

Bumiputera quota

Pro-Bumiputera quotas remain as part of the government’s economic policies.

On September 27, Najib said, “We want to do away from (with) quotas but we must support them (Bumiputera entrepreneurs) in a way that would allow them to grow” in a bid to calm growing unhappiness with the affirmative action plan that favoured one community.

After suggestions that the PM had decided to abolish quotas, Najib clarified three days later: “I did not say we want to abolish quotas, but I said we cannot be too reliant on them”.

National Feedlot Corp scandal

It started off with Najib being firmly with Women, Family and Community Development Minister Datuk Seri Shahrizat Jalil, after story broke that her family members had been very liberal with the use of a RM250 million soft loan to a National Feedlot Corporation.

The company was set up to reduce Malaysia’s dependency on foreign beef. However the pasture for the company extended as far as Bangsar condominiums and other baffling purchases.

As the attacks grew on Shahrizat’s CEO husband, Umno’s resolve to defend its Wanita Umno chief weakened, as did the reluctance of the authorities to investigate the case.

Police and the Malaysian Anti-Corruption Agency eventually started investigations after seeing widespread public dissatisfaction.

Peaceful Assembly Act/Bill 2011

On the eve of Malaysia Day on September 16 Najib went on live television and promised the end of oppressive laws such as the Internal Security Act, Banishment Act and a slew of laws used to suppress political dissent.

There was a collective sigh of relief, but within days his cousin Hishammuddin announced that there would be new laws to fill the void.

On November 24, as a show of progress since Bersih 2.0, the Peaceful Assembly Bill was tabled.

It was pilloried instantly by legislators, and citizens were not far behind.

Critics said the new law, despite its name, would create more restrictions on the right of the public to assemble than the laws it would be replacing.

The government was forced to modify part of the law but many social activists and opposition politicians remain unhappy with the legislature that was eventually passed by Parliament.

-themalaysianinsider

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

This article went : ‘ And voters will get to eventually decide if they want to punish or reward Barisan Nasional (BN) when Datuk Seri Najib Razak calls elections. ‘

Nothing against Najib here (other issues like APARTHEID notwithstanding) but how is it that the 99.999% cannot decide but 1 man decides when to call elections?

MPs who want to be voted, need to change the law to allow the voters to decide when to call for elections rather than the PM or at least for the MPs at 66.6% quorum to decide when to call elections. Democracy means 66.6% quorums not a one man decision! Another dated law aspect of constitution to be amended! bar Council, still not hitting the books yet? WTF is Bar Council doing about things like these, much less neurotech abuse of citizens?

MPs who want to be voted need to change the law to allow ALL the voters (True ‘1-man 1-vote’ Democracy) at 66.6% quorum to decide when to call for elections rather than the PM alone, or at least for (Representative Democracy) the 222 MPs at 66.6% quorum to decide when to call elections than the PM alone. Democracy means 66.6% quorums not a one man decision! Another dated law aspect of constitution to be amended! bar Council, still not hitting the books yet?

What is Bar Council doing about constitutional things like these, much less neurotech abuse of citizens much less Section 377B, and University Colleges Act, Printing Presses Act? March around then hide and hope it blows over? Do you know how long the APARTHEID issue has been addressed by some of us that Bar Councul dare not even touch on?

3 Articles highlighting RACISM and Freedom of Choice

In Uncategorized on February 3, 2012 at 4:27 pm

ARTICLE 1 – Airline passenger arrested over saggy pants – by Associated Press – 19th June 2011
http://www2.oanow.com/news/2011/jun/19/airline-passenger-arrested-over-saggy-pants-ar-1997137/

SAN FRANCISCO — A University of New Mexico football player who was arrested after wearing saggy pants on a plane at the San Francisco airport insists in a video showing part of his exchange with authorities that his pants were up and he had done nothing wrong.

The San Francisco Chronicle obtained the video and a link to it was on the newspaper’s website Saturday.

“My pants are up sir,” a seated DeShon Marman tells the captain, who along with someone who appears to be a San Francisco police officer, is standing near his seat on the plane. “I’m not doing anything. I paid my fees, and I’m ready to go.”

The Chronicle said it obtained the three-minute video from a passenger who was sitting near Marman during Wednesday’s incident and did not wish to be identified.

What the video does not show is Marman’s repeated refusal earlier to follow a boarding agent’s advice and pull up his pants, Elise Eberwein, a spokeswoman for US Airways, told The Associated Press on Saturday.

“When he was asked by our employee at the Jetway to please pull them up, that employee was told to pull them up for him,” she said. “And that exchange continued to the door of the plane.”

The 20-year-old’s pants were so low they were “exposing areas that most people would not want to see” and violating the airline’s expectation that customers won’t dress offensively, Eberwein said.

Attempts by the AP to reach Marman were not successful. A call to his attorney’s office Saturday afternoon was not returned, and calls to listings for people with his mother’s name in San Francisco were not returned or went unanswered.

News reports have identified his attorney as Joe O’Sullivan and his mother as Donna Doyle.

Marman said in an interview with KGO-TV this week that his pants were slightly below his waist, and he was unable to lift them up because he had bags in his hands. In a statement released through the university Friday, he said he was “embarrassed at the negative attention” the incident had generated.

“I believe in due time all the facts of the matter will come to light,” he said. He said any additional comment would come through his attorney.

O’Sullivan told the Chronicle that nothing was visible once his client sat down.

“The issue should have been over,” he said.

Marman was arrested on suspicion of trespassing, battery of a police officer and obstruction after refusing to leave the plane on the captain’s orders, according to police. Police have also said he injured an officer while being taken into custody.

“He’s refusing to get off,” Eberwein said. “The captain’s thinking, ‘What if he refuses something else in the air?'”

Marman was released on bail Thursday. Prosecutors have until July 18 to file any charges against him.

ARTICLE 2 – Man in women’s underwear allowed to fly

http://www.azfamily.com/news/local/Crossdressing-man-allowed-to-board-plane-while-football-player-is-not-124399689.html

Fallout over scantily dressed man at airport – by Alicia E. Barrón – 23rd June 2011

PHOENIX – The college football player who was asked to leave a plane for wearing saggy pants is speaking out about a man who is allowed to travel wearing nothing but lingerie.

Deshon Marman was asked to get off a flight for wearing saggy pants that he refused to pull up. He was arrested and later charged with suspicion of trespassing, battery of a police officer and obstruction after refusing to leave on captain’s orders.

On the other hand, another male passenger is allowed to frequently fly to and from Phoenix on US Airways wearing nothing but undergarments. He has become a YouTube sensation but has many questioning if this is double standard.

The scantily clad man has been seen and taped in numerous airports across the country.

Jessica Malin has seen the man in lingerie at the airport.

“I was pretty pumped to see this man in his lingerie,” she said. “It was kind of offensive but it was entertaining.”

“I feel like if it was a rapper or a superstar walking on the airplane…sagging his pants, they would want his autograph,” Marman said. “They wouldn’t tell him, ‘Hey can you pull up your pants please?’”

“Leads to only one conclusion, that because Mr. Marman is black, wearing dreads he was treated differently,” said Marman’s lawyer, Joe O’Sullivan.

3TV has learned the man in lingerie is a Phoenix resident and a frequent US Airways passenger. US Airways officials say they do not enforce a dress code as long as a person’s “private parts” are covered up.

ARTICLE 3 – Man in women’s underwear allowed to fly – by Jennifer Thomas – 23rd June 2011

http://www.azfamily.com/news/local/Crossdressing-man-allowed-to-board-plane-while-football-player-is-not-124399689.html

PHOENIX – A college football player was asked to get off a US Airways flight due to his saggy clothing, but there was no issue when a scantily clad man boarded a plane to Phoenix.

Deshon Marman, who plays for the University of New Mexico, was pulled off a plane at San Francisco International Airport last week after US Airways claims he refused to pull up his pants.

He was arrested on suspicion of trespassing after police say he refused to leave the plane on captain’s orders.

But just days before that incident, a man wearing women’s underwear and high heels had no trouble getting on board a US Airways flight to Phoenix.

It wasn’t the cross-dresser’s first flight to Phoenix wearing women’s clothing. Several passengers snapped photos of the man, whose name has not been released.

When shown pictures of the man, several people at Sky Harbor International Airport felt the attire was inappropriate.

“I would call that indecent exposure, actually,” Heather Sisneros said.

“They shouldn’t allow it,” Jennifer Dake said.

“I’ve actually seen this guy come down the concourses,” Bill Machnick said. I’ve seen him in the airport numerous times.”

A passenger on the man’s flight said several people complained, but US Airways told her that if a passenger is not exposing their private parts, they’re allowed to fly.

In a statement, US Airways officials said the company does not have a dress code, but “our crew is authorized to use discretion to ensure the comfort and safety of all passengers.”

Prosecutors have until July 18 to file charges against Marman.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Meanwhile the hijab and burkha is banned in the most racist of countries. While nudism is allowed in some of these racist counbtries as well! Why the inconsistencies? The nation which allows BOTH nudist and burkha wearer, as well as crossdresser and saggy pant wearer (this is entirely moot actually, those boxers are far more clothed than the flimsy shorts or even sumo loin cloths or bikinis you can see being worn everywhere else. Why persecute Deshon for saggy pants to expose no flesh or a consensual hijab wearer? (ask to identify at most but a ban is excessive).

This shows either RACISM or FUNDAMENTALISM, both undesirable in the contaxt of thoday’s modern era. Kudos to Phoenix Airport, I’m surprised that Arizona while having the worst laws on immigrants is aong the most LGBT friendly in USA. The contrasts in inconsistencies are amazing to say the least. How about being good guys all the way and removing the TSA as well?

Aid Destroyed Detroit – Is Your Town Next? – by Frosty Wooldridge – 26th May 2011

In Uncategorized on January 31, 2012 at 3:40 pm

For 15 years, from the mid 1970’s to 1990, I worked in Detroit , Michigan . I watched it descend into the abyss of crime, debauchery, gun play, drugs, school truancy, car-jacking, gangs and human depravity. I watched entire city blocks burned out. I watched graffiti explode on buildings, cars, trucks, buses and school yards.Trash everywhere! Detroiters walked through it, tossed more into it, and ignored it. Tens of thousands, and then hundreds of thousands today exist on federal welfare, free housing, and food stamps! With Aid to Dependent Children, minority women birthed eight to 10, and in one case, one woman birthed 24 children as reported by the Detroit Free Press, all on American taxpayer dollars. A new child meant a new car payment, new TV, and whatever mom wanted. I saw Lyndon Baines Johnson’s ‘Great Society’ flourish in Detroit .

If you give money for doing nothing, you will get more hands out taking money for doing nothing Mayor Coleman Young, perhaps the most corrupt mayor in America , outside of Richard Daley in Chicago , rode Detroit down to its knees… He set the benchmark for cronyism, incompetence, and arrogance. As a black man, he said, “I am the MFIC.” The IC meant “in charge”. You can figure out the rest Detroit became a majority black city with 67 percent African-Americans. As a United Van Lines truck driver for my summer job from teaching math and science, I loaded hundreds of American families into my van for a new life in another city or state. Detroit plummeted from 1.8 million citizens to 912,000 today. At the same time, legal and illegal immigrants converged on the city, so much so, that Muslims number over 300,000. Mexicans number 400,000 throughout Michigan , but most work in Detroit . As the whites moved out, the Muslims moved in. As the crimes became more violent, the whites fled. Finally, unlawful Mexicans moved in at a torrid pace. Detroit suffers so much shoplifting that grocery stores no longer operate in many inner city locations. You could cut the racial tension in the air with a knife!

Detroit may be one of our best examples of multiculturalism: pure dislike, and total separation from America . Today, you hear Muslim calls to worship over the city like a new American Baghdad with hundreds of Islamic mosques in Michigan , paid for by Saudi Arabia oil money. High school flunk out rates reached 76 percent last June, according to NBC’s Brian Williams. Classrooms resemble more foreign countries than America . English? Few speak it! The city features a 50 percent illiteracy rate and growing. Unemployment hit 28.9 percent in 2009 as the auto industry vacated the city. In Time Magazine’s October 4, 2009, “The Tragedy of Detroit: How a great city fell, and how it can rise again,” I choked on the writer’s description of what happened. “If Detroit had been ravaged by a hurricane, and submerged by a ravenous flood, we’d know a lot more about it,” said Daniel Okrent.

“If drought and carelessness had spread brush fires across the city, we’d see it on the evening news every night.” Earthquake, tornadoes, you name it, if natural disaster had devastated the city that was once the living proof of American prosperity, the rest of the country might take notice. But Detroit , once our fourth largest city, now 11th and slipping rapidly, has had no such luck. Its disaster has long been a slow unwinding that seemed to remove it from the rest of the country. Even the death rattle that in the past year emanated from its signature industry brought more attention to the auto executives than to the people of the city, who had for so long been victimized by their dreadful decision making.” As Coleman Young’s corruption brought the city to its knees, no amount of federal dollars could save the incredible payoffs, kickbacks and illegality permeating his administration. I witnessed the city’s death from the seat of my 18-wheeler tractor trailer because I moved people out of every sector of decaying Detroit . “By any quantifiable standard, the city is on life support. Detroit ‘s treasury is $300 million short of the funds needed to provide the barest municipal services,” Okrent said. “The school system, which six years ago was compelled by the teachers’ union to reject a philanthropist’s offer of $200 million to build 15 small, independent charter high schools, is in receivership. The murder rate is soaring, and 7 out of 10 remain unsolved. Three years after Katrina devastated New Orleans , unemployment in that city hit a peak of 11%. In Detroit today, the unemployment rate is 28.9%.

That’s worth spelling out: twenty-eight point nine percent. At the end of Okrent’s report, and he will write a dozen more about Detroit, he said, “That’s because the story of Detroit is not simply one of a great city’s collapse, it’s also about the erosion of the industries that helped build the country we know today. The ultimate fate of Detroit will reveal much about the character ofAmerica in the 21st century. If what was once the most prosperous manufacturing city in the nation has been brought to its knees, what does that say about our recent past? And if it can’t find a way to get up, what does that say about America ‘s future?” As you read in my book review of Chris Steiner’s book,”$20 Per Gallon”, the auto industry won’t come back. Immigration will keep pouring more and more uneducated third world immigrants from the Middle East into Detroit , thus creating a beachhead for Islamic hegemony in America . If 50 percent illiteracy continues, we will see more homegrown terrorists spawned out of the Muslim ghettos of Detroit . Illiteracy plus Islam equals walking human bombs. You have already seen it in Madrid , Spain , London , England and Paris , France with train bombings, subway bombings and riots. As their numbers grow, so will their power to enact their barbaric Sharia Law that negates republican forms of government, first amendment rights, and subjugates women to the lowest rungs on the human ladder. We will see more honor killings by upset husbands, fathers and brothers that demand subjugation by their daughters, sisters and wives. Muslims prefer beheadings of women to scare the hell out of any other members of their sect from straying. Multiculturalism: what a perfect method to kill our language, culture, country and way of life.

I PRAY EVERYONE THAT READS THIS REALIZES THAT IF WE DON’T STAND UP, AND SCREAM AT WASHINGTON , AND OUR STATE, CITY AND LOCAL LEADERS THIS IS WHAT AWAITS THE REST OF AMERICA . IF YOU THINK MEXICANS AND MUSLIMS AND OTHER FORIEGNERS WILL EVENTUALLY FIT RIGHT IN THEN YOU ARE AS BIG A PART OF THE PROBLEM AS THEY ARE. “Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.” — Benjamin Franklin

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It was high taxes or even mere assessments levied at non-profitable businesses that killed Detroit. The psychology and tolerance of any city or even person, will only take so much imposed on it. If these were not applied, at least some businesses would have stubbornly hung on still able to provide a trickle of jobs and production capability ready to come back on if needed.

Whats more, those zoning restrictions would if not applied have allowed SOME old factories into extended homes at least, but the way the law is enforced, against all commonsense (like the TSA) and without allowances for poverty or down turns, these buildings were abandoned. Rethink which sanctimonious awning or gazebo forbidding council or assemblyman you might vote in mind AND if they are ready to be as forgiving as the economy globally is not. If they need you to submit form and wait 6 mths for approvals through state sanctioned architecture companies to regulate the your PRIVATE plans for a simple awning inside your home, then better think twice.

They would never let you use the public space with any common sense and tax VERY IMPORTANT businesses that are hitting non-profitable patches even as they allow golden parachutes to stock companies making losses in open collusion right under your nose – with complaining people like Frosty not acting to remove them from power to boot ! If they will not allow a factory to be turned into an extended family home but rather let it rot, then woe betide your society. Or keep taxing non-profitable companies or competing and edging out the private sector ILLEGALLY via GLCs, justified by conflict of interest or vested interest laws, mcuh the way nepotists create oligarchies around them via political parties. Such places where voters do not act, will ALL be Detroit in 20 years or less, as cheaper to function in or less red tape type nations take over where USA become over-regulated so that no American was allowed to even use his own factory space or even buy an old school to at least plant crops to feed themselves and live in as a shelter.

VAT, GST, Toll Concessions and a myriad of blindly levied taxes destroy societies, act and vote against policy makers who will do nothing to roll back these things or be crushed by Big Government and Big Brother. This could be the last ‘free’ generation speaking, act to remove oligarchs, nepotists, crypto-racists, open racists, neurotech using technofascsists, NLP-using psychiatric establishment, colluding politicians, corrupt bureaucrats and whoever out to destroy the country you are from. That is the only thing the vote is for, not because someone smiled and kissed your kid or appeared to be a moral exemplar but later trashed the law and constitution to benefit themselves while remaining morally ‘perfect’.

Think before you vote and if all candidates stink WHERE IT MATTERS (i.e. writing good policies), run for election yourself, it is every citizen’s right.

Mind-reading scientists predict what a person is going to do before they do it – by Daily Mail Reporter – 1st July 2011

In Uncategorized on January 30, 2012 at 3:02 pm
It has long been a dream of both scientists and law enforcement officials alike. Researchers monitoring brain activity can now determine what action a person is planning before he carries it out. Although it is currently only possible to know what someone is going to do just moments before it happens, the implications of the breakthrough are huge. Scroll down for video Breakthrough: Researchers monitoring brain activity can now determine what action a person is planning before he carries it out Breakthrough: Researchers monitoring brain activity can now determine what action a person is planning before he carries it out Police, for example, would love to know what a criminal is intending to do during a tense armed stand-off. Lead researcher Jason Gallivan, of the University of Western Ontario, said: ‘This is a considerable step forward in our understanding of how the human brain plans actions.’
 
Over the course of a one-year study, volunteers had their brain activity scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while they performed one of three hand movements – grasping the top of an object, grasping the bottom of the object, or simply reaching out and touching the object. The scientists found that by using the signals from many brain regions, they could predict, better than chance, which of the actions the volunteer was merely intending to do, seconds later. One day soon? Christopher Walken in the 1983 sci-fi film Brainstorm, which follows a team of scientists who record their thoughts
 
One day soon? Christopher Walken in the 1983 sci-fi film Brainstorm, which follows a team of scientists who record their thoughts
 
Co-author Jody Culham said: ‘Neuro-imaging allows us to look at how action planning unfolds within human brain areas without having to insert electrodes directly into the human brain. ‘This is obviously far less intrusive.’ The new findings could also have important clinical implications. Mr Gallivan said: ‘Being able to predict a human’s desired movements using brain signals takes us one step closer to using those signals to control prosthetic limbs in movement-impaired patient populations, like those who suffer from spinal cord injuries or locked-in syndrome.’ The findings are published in the Journal of Neuroscience. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2010245/Mind-reading-scientists-predict-person-going-it.html
 
 
 
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As formal a Confirmation of existence of Neurotech as any. Combine this with Telecoms technology like the wirless cellphone and the Orwellian surveillance society is impossible to escape. Run for elections free minded citizens wherever you are with or without a political party backing you or set up one – the Mental Autonomy / Mentral Privacy Party along side or within your Green Parties.Pass bills and laws that prohibit such technologies, or freedom as we know it, will have ended.

The Half-There House – by Ellen Gamerman, WSJ.com – 29th Jun 2011

In Uncategorized on January 30, 2012 at 3:01 pm
A 6,400-square foot home is half-buried in a grassy slope in East Hampton, NY. When Bob Stansel and Tammy Marek were planning their new luxury home here, they didn’t want to overwhelm the neighbors. So they buried half of it. Except for its arching corrugated metal roof, the unadorned modern structure built of concrete and glass barely rises higher than the grassy slope into which it’s built. More than 3,200 of the four-bedroom home’s roughly 6,400 square feet are located in a lower level, making the house appear more than twice as big from the side as it does from the front. Using subterranean construction to avoid restrictive building codes is a popular option in places like California’s Napa Valley, where home owners burrow underground for more space. But the couple here said their decision wasn’t driven by regulations; instead it was their own desire for a pared-down aesthetic. “I don’t think I’d want people thinking that was my dream of retirement, to build some monster,” said Mr. Stansel, a 65-year-old former mortgage banker who moved into the East Hampton home with his wife this winter.
 
“We didn’t want a bunch of expensive decorations on the outside.” On the property, Japanese maple and copper beech trees sit near a planted flat-roofed garage and grass driveway whose wide-set cobblestones look like part of the landscaping. Mr. Stansel took a 1,200-pound glacial rock, which he bought for $2,000 after becoming intrigued by its Alaska history, and trucked it from storage in Portland, Ore. to use outside as a garden feature. The owners filled the home with pieces chosen by an interior decorator. The interior is simple, reflecting the desires of Ms. Marek, a 52-year-old day trader and horse lover—the couple has four horses that are boarded away from home in Connecticut and Holland. “It’s more like a loft,” she said. The front door leads to an open plan living area with flooring made of Oregon black walnut and white Bulgarian limestone. A concrete slab marks the staircase, which is held up with a harpsichord-like row of steel cables. Arched glass walls surround the modern living room and lacquered wood kitchen, hugging the curve of the roof. Downstairs, a sitting area and den are lit by three pairs of 9-foot tall glass French doors around a lower courtyard. Mr. Stansel’s study and a general storage area, however, are in rooms without any direct light.
 
Architects are seeing more houses with unassuming façades that explode in size when viewed from the back, or homes split into multiple buildings so they’ll look less massive, or even homes that New York architect Lee Skolnick calls “McRanchions”—1950s ranch houses given luxury makeovers. “There’s a trend we’re seeing—it’s called ‘perceived thrift,'” said Chris Rose, an architect based in Charleston, S.C. “It’s kind of like the ladies going to Bergdorf’s and still buying stuff, but putting it in a brown bag.” Mr. Stansel had his fill when it came to towering properties: In 2009, he and Ms. Marek bought Canterbury Castle, a 1930s landmark in Portland, Ore. with a moat, drawbridge and turret, for about $290,000. They were already living in the house next door and bought the site as an investment. The city had deemed the crumbling edifice structurally unsound, clearing the way for the couple to raze it. Some locals were opposed, but the couple considered it unsafe and an eye sore. At the same time, Mr. Stansel and Ms. Marek were beginning construction on the Long Island house.
 
East Hampton-based architect Maziar Behrooz had come up with a design for the land’s previous owner, who was inspired by a photo of an F-16 fighter jet nosing out of an airplane hangar for the building’s shape. Mr. Behrooz dubbed it the Arc House, after the curve of the galvanized aluminum roof. Mr. Stansel was drawn to the home’s low-slung profile. The couple paid $1.25 million for the property down a long road lined with tall pines, and another $2.2 million for the building, Mr. Stansel said. Nearby, in a subdivision with meadows and fields for polo matches, a home is on the market for $2.9 million. The couple moved to New York because they thought it would make it easier to travel to Europe in their retirement, though they are considering spending the winters in Portland if they don’t find a buyer for their property there. Outside their Long Island home, a memento from their Portland past is now set into the ground. Two heavy stones serve as steps to a soon-to-be-built Zen garden—pieces of the castle they once owned.
 
 
 
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Isn’t this America land of the free? Why should there be a need for ‘ using subterranean construction to avoid restrictive building codes ‘ ? Which idiots write and ratify these codes? By the way in a certain 3rd world country the below abuse of residents is occurring : http://img825.imageshack.us/img825/1378/gambier1.jpg Vote them out and rewrite those codes! If you don’t have a good candidate, run for candidacy on the ticket of rewriting restrictive building codes ! Do not let them tell you what to do or how to build on your private land! Want lower taxes? Property assessments? Freedom from apartheid? Run for candidacy or find out which MP cannot be voted due to their oppressive social or political beliefs and unvotable desire to impose restrictive building (in some places DRESS – allow Burkha! Allow Nudism!) codes !

Three to hang for kidnap – by SRI VIGASHINI – 28th June 2011

In Justice, Law, Malaysia, spirit of the law, word of the law on January 30, 2012 at 2:59 pm
(newsdesk@thestar.com.my) JOHOR BARU: The High Court here sentenced three men to the gallows and two others were detained at the pleasure of the Ruler for kidnapping a schoolgirl three years ago. P. Steven, 26, P. Vicknes, 29, and R. Ravikumar, 22, were handed the death sentence for abducting a 13-year-old girl with the intention of getting a ransom of RM500,000 in Tampoi at around 11.20am on April 28, 2008. However, Judge Kamardin Hash­im ordered that two others, both 19, be detained at the pleasure of the Johor Sultan under Section 97(2)(b) of the Child Act 2001 because they were underage when the offence was committed. To the gallows: The accused being escorted out of the Johor Baru High Court after the sentence was delivered. According to the facts of the case, the victim was abducted while she was on her way to school.
The victim’s dad subsequently paid RM80,000 to the accused at a petrol station in Sungai Besi. S. Vijayaretanam represented Vicknes while Mohd Haijan Omar represented the other four. Both lawyers appealed for a lighter sentence. Mohd Haijan said the accused had not harmed the victim. “The victim was not injured and they provided her with food and clothes,” he said. Vijayaretanam said the victim was not sexually harassed. However Deputy Public Prosec­utor Muhamad Iskandar Ahmad said the offence was serious. They were charged under Section 3 of the Kidnapping Act 1961, which carries the death sentence or life imprisonment, as well as whipping. Earlier, nine accused were charged with abducting the girl but four were acquitted in April after the prosecution failed to prove a prima facie case against them. All the accused were silent while the verdict was read out while some of their family members were seen weeping. The girl’s father M. Paramasivam, 48, who was present in court, said that he was satisfied with the judgment. “I accompany my daughter whenever she goes out as she is still afraid to step out of the house alone,” the businessman said. He added that he had also moved out of his old home as he was afraid for the safety of his family.
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The judge should punish according to the final ending of the situation. In this case the victimised family had a shock they would recover from in a few years at most. All were unharmed. But collectively these 3 people have up to 200 years of life taken away from them in a somewhat violent manner (hanging means that the neck is broken in a manner that kills via a noose). Is that a fair judgment, do the offenders learn anything?
To be lenient and even politically correct, the offenders could be required at very least to pay for any emotional or psychological stress quantifiable by some psyche personnel within the policeforce (this should not be  more than the entire value of the offender even if calculated by qualified panels of experts – we can’t have people demanding 100s of millions nor can people without the money pay damages that are impossible to foot , but we can ensure that the victims are protected from further abuse and compensated for any losses from the incident from any and all parties involved), offenders be put on probation having to report to a probation officer for a few months with a lifetime restraining order, preventing them from approaching the victims without permission from the court. At worst exile the offenders after a public apology at a public venue at Tampoi witnessed by any person’s interested in this case, probably media and judges, some relatives and busybodies.
Then extract some sort of compensation to the family, not more than will affect a reasonable living standard for the offender, as long as the victims require or as audited by some expert panel. Instead of imprisoning at taxpayer expense and making the offenders lose their lives quite meaninglessly with a fairly violent method, they could be made to pay out of their pockets (to some people loss of cash does not hurt them so for these people a tit for tat event could be more appropriate) or have the same done to them.
The offenders were greedy but not violent, nor did they imprison the victims so they should not be imprisoned in turn at cost to the taxpayer. This is a bad judgment IMHO as it is not equitable or commensurate with the suffering of the victims. Only the prison contractors benefit here. And conditions in jail are not necessarily appropriate unless we have fake ‘prisoners’ put into jail to mete out specifically tailored punishments – in which case the taxpayer loses again. Don’t hang, rehabilitate and let them live out the course of their lives, their mulling of the issue will be beneficial compared to a violent hanging and meaningless death.

NHS failed my dying father, reveals health secretary Andrew Lansley – by Daily Mail Reporter – 26th June 2011

In Uncategorized on January 30, 2012 at 2:58 pm
89-year-old was left in observation bay for days because no beds were available. Former pathologist discharged himself due to lack of care. Health secretary Andrew Lansley has told of his grief after his dying father was left in a hospital observation bay for several days because there were no beds available. Thomas Lansley, a distinguished NHS pathologist, died last year from cancer after spending the last six months of his life as an NHS patient. The health secretary, who was drawing up plans for NHS reforms at the time, said there were significant shortcomings in the way his father was treated especially during the final stages of the illness. Health Secretary Andrew Lansley was planning NHS reforms while his father Thomas, who was suffering from cancer, was one of the organisation’s patients Health Secretary Andrew Lansley was planning NHS reforms while his father Thomas, who was suffering from cancer, was one of the organisation’s patients Highlighting a lack of co-ordination between the many doctors and departments, he said he had been unable to work out who was in charge of caring for his father. Writing in the health service journal he said: ‘Those six months leading up to his death were very difficult.
 
‘I may have been secretary of state at the time but I still had a Sunday evening where I was trying to find him in the hospital that he had been taken to by an ambulance, and that took me about an hour and a half. ‘He was still in the observation bay next to the Accident and Emergency department for three or four days because they had no bed where he could be transferred to. ‘It was difficult – I’m the secretary of state for goodness sake – trying to work out, at any given moment, who was in charge. ‘Was it the GP… or was it at that moment the oncologist, was it the palliative care consultant, was it the hospice?’ Last month at a conference to mark the 20th anniversary of the National Council for Palliative Care Mr Lansley talked about how his father, who was one of the first scientists to work for the NHS, had found life difficult as a patient. He said: ‘He was in an inpatient bed in a community hospital and he discharged himself, because he thought, ‘Nothing’s going on here’.’ However Mr Lansley said that things improved in the final stages of his father’s illness and that he eventually had a ‘good death.’ He said: ‘Things at the end did get joined up. ‘When we talk about what does a good death look like, I have had a chance to see it’. His comments come as a report into end-of-life care is due to be published next week. It is expected to advise that the £104 million currently spent on emergency hospital admissions should be redirected into care for the dying in their own homes. While most people say they would like to die on their own home, currently four out of five die in hospital. Thomas Lansley, who was 89 when he died last November, ran a pathology laboratory in London from 1955 to 1983.
 
 
 
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If not that the Health Secretary was allowing his father’s natural death to be used in a propaganda story to justify so many other abuses or shortfalls in the English system, the neglect in the system itself is unbelievable and when it affects even a pathology lab skillef medical person shocking to the extreme. England is really gone. Little wonder the issues with the English economy. This is what nepotism and lack of meritocracy does to a nation. Very chilling that it even affects the Health Secretary!?! Falling through the cracks personified . . .