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2 Articles Identifying Liverpool (and another 2 cities) as housing suitable LC districts and demographics for a OPZ (Organic Psychedelics Zone) – @AgreeToDisagree – 29th February 2012

In advocacy, amendments to law needed, better laws, candidacy, drug laws, drugs, England, Freedom of Expression, freedom of speech, preserving chav culture, Prostitution, psychedelics, separation of powers, specialisation, spirit of the law on February 29, 2012 at 2:27 pm

ARTICLE 1

UN: drug gangs controlling parts of British cities Parts of British cities are becoming no-go areas where drugs gangs are effectively in control, a United Nations drugs chief said today. – 10:00AM GMT 28 Feb 2012

Professor Hamid Ghodse, president of the UN’s International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), said there was ”a vicious cycle of social exclusion and drugs problems and fractured communities” in cities such as Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester.

The development of ”no-go areas” was being fuelled by threats such as social inequality, migration and celebrities normalising drug abuse, he warned.

How should Britain’s drug problem be tackled?

Helping marginalised communities with drugs problems ”must be a priority”, he said.

”We are looking at social cohesion, the social disintegration and illegal drugs.

”In many societies around the world, whether developed or developing, there are communities within the societies which develop which become no-go areas.

”Drug traffickers, organised crime, drug users, they take over. They will get the sort of governance of those areas.

”Examples are in Brazil, Mexico, in the United States, in the UK, Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, and therefore it is no good to have only law enforcement, which always shows it does not succeed.”

Prof Ghodse called for such communities to be offered drug abuse prevention programmes, treatment and rehabilitation services, and the same levels of educational, employment and recreational opportunities as in the wider society.

”Youth of these communities must have similar chances to those in the wide society and have a right to be protected from drug abuse and drug dependence,” he said.

”It is crucial that the needs of communities experiencing social disintegration are urgently tackled before the tipping point is reached, beyond which effective action becomes impossible.

”The consequences of failure are too high for society and should be avoided at all cost.”

The INCB’s annual report for 2011 found persistent social inequality, migration, emerging cultures of excess and a shift in traditional values were some of the key threats to social cohesion.

As the gap between rich and poor widens, and ”faced with a future with limited opportunities, individuals within these communities may increasingly become disengaged from the wider society and become involved in a range of personally and socially harmful behaviours, including drug abuse and drug dealing,” it said.

The report added: ”While migration offers many positive benefits to the migrant and to society at large, it can create a sense of dislocation from the surrounding community and a sense of vulnerability on the part of those who are displaced.

”Where migrating social groups have travelled from areas associated with illicit drug production and drug abuse, there is a greater likelihood of individuals engaging in forms of drug misuse as a way of coping with such a sense of dislocation.”

Celebrities’ use of illicit drugs may also ”contribute to a growing normalisation of certain forms of drug misuse within the wider society and in turn can lead to the undermining of social cohesion”.

But the INCB warned none of the factors ”should be seen as leading individuals inevitably into a lifestyle of drug abuse and criminality”.

”Whatever the social processes and social pressures at hand, human beings still have the capacity to exercise some element of choice in what they do and what they refrain from doing,” it said.

A Home Office spokesman said: ”The Ending Gang and Youth Violence report published by the Government in 2011 sets out a comprehensive strategy for supporting local areas to reduce the effects of gang violence.

”We want to stop young people from joining gangs in the first place through intervention and support to children and families at risk of gang violence.

”This will be matched with tough and intensive enforcement action to bring perpetrators to justice.”

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

The ‘downtown’ districts of these areas Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester could be considered for Organic Psychedelics Zones (OPZ) like the one in  the city of Amsterdam  near the red light district (RLD) in Netherlands.

ARTICLE 2

Jane Doe to Lady Mayor : She’s the serial mistress who destroyed a defence chief. Now she’s aiming to seduce the voters of Liverpool and transform herself – by Helen Weathers – Last updated at 11:13 PM on 24th February 2012

Glamorous: Bienvenida Buck has made a career of seducing powerful and influential men

Pink champagne in hand, Bienvenida Buck leads the way into her chic new Liverpool apartment. It is only 11am but, as she explains, there is nothing quite like a fine crystal glass of something ‘light and sparkling’ to bring a glow to a lady’s complexion.

We pass through the hallway where a vast canvas of Bienvenida, painted in 1990 by royal portrait artist Richard Stone, takes pride of place. It was a wedding gift from her first husband, the late Sir Anthony Buck, former Tory MP and QC.

‘It’s magnificent, no? He used the same canvas as he used for the Queen,’ she says, padding across the pristine pale beige carpet. ‘Sir Anthony brought me into a world of beauty. He was a good man.’

Sadly for him, he was not the only man. Bienvenida has made a career of seducing powerful and influential older men, capitalising on her kittenish charms. Her most notorious conquest was Sir Peter Harding, Chief of the Defence Staff during the Gulf War, with whom she had an affair while still married to Sir Anthony.

The ‘Spanish Firecracker’, as she was dubbed by the Press, sold her story in 1994 to a red-top tabloid for a reported £150,000, ending Sir Peter’s career and accelerating her divorce from Sir Anthony (who died in 2003).

But that was 18 years ago — ancient history in Bienvenida’s eyes — and there have been two husbands (one a Count) and several lovers since.

Her third husband, Spanish lawyer Eduardo Jimeni, died from cancer in 2008, so she’s a widow now — and seemingly a merry one.

‘Marriage does not suit me,’ she says. ‘I have had 20 years of married hell. I am a romantic, I like to be taken out to dinner, to hold hands, but I will never marry again. No, no, no!

‘I don’t need companionship — I have a dog for that.’

Today, at the age of 55, the former Lady Buck is looking for a completely new direction. Where once her life’s ambition was to be the ‘power behind the throne’, now, it seems, she wants the throne for herself.

Power and passion: Lady Buck in 1994 with her ex-husband Sir Anthony Buck, left, and in 2000 with then Chief of Defence Staff Sir Peter Harding, her lover

It is hard to imagine a more unlikely candidate for Mayor of Liverpool, but Bienvenida tells me she is seriously considering throwing her designer hat into the ring.

This May, Liverpool is set to become one of the first cities outside London to ask voters to directly elect a Mayor, and Bienvenida likes the idea of becoming the North’s equivalent of London’s Boris Johnson — another blonde with an interesting private life.

Though born in Spain and a resident in Liverpool for just three years, Bienvenida firmly believes she could provide the ‘strong and accountable leadership’ required.

‘I think that I could win. I am the voice of the young people of this city. I know a lot of influential people who could bring investment to Liverpool, I have very good connections,’ she says knowingly, before taking a delicate sip of her champagne.

Independent: Lady Buck claims she is finished with marriage after three husbands, and is not looking for companionship

‘I have travelled on Concorde hundreds of times and stayed in palaces. I have lived in Dallas, Texas and Dubai. I have met princes and have contacts with very powerful entities and governments.’

Whether this is the sort of contact that might benefit Liverpool is open to debate, but Bienvenida believes she is truly in tune with her new adopted home.

‘I live in a very secure, prestigious part of Liverpool, but here I like to travel by bus. I like to go out of my comfort zone to learn about this city,’ says Bienvenida, who shares her home with her 14-year-old King Charles spaniel, named Lalique after her favourite crystal.

‘The people of Liverpool are kind and generous. I have lost my mobile phone three times and it has always been returned to me. The people here are hard workers. These are not lazy people, they are fighters. They deserve much better.’

The question is, do they deserve Bienvenida?

After all, she tells me she moved to Liverpool from St John’s Wood in London after watching an episode of the Channel 4 programme Location, Location, Location and marvelling at the ‘quality of life’ afforded by much cheaper property prices.

She knows few people in Liverpool. Much of her vision for the city is the product of conversations with the gardeners and cleaners who maintain the swish complex where she lives, or the students working part-time in the upmarket bars she frequents.

‘I don’t have many friends here, no,’ she admits. ‘I did have a couple of ladies I used to go out with, but they didn’t have much to talk about. I have never seen a woman here reading a newspaper, but I am very much in touch with the students.’

Not exactly sentiments to clinch the female votes — but to this she seems oblivious. She ushers me into her elegant living room to discuss her manifesto, which she has rather appropriately called ‘Blonde Ambitions’.

The first paragraph contains this insightful gem: ‘Cuts in manpower, police, firefighters and council workers should be avoided.’

Before we can tackle Liverpool’s infrastructure, however, Bienvenida can’t resist pointing out an exquisite Venetian mirror hanging on the wall.

‘That was a gift from a very special man in my life,’ she says coyly. ‘I’m not saying who, but he is very, very special.’

Beneath the mirror is a Lalique vase filled with more than 20 long-stemmed red roses. ‘They were a Valentine’s Day gift,’ she purrs.
Strong: Bienvenida believes she would make an excellent leader for Liverpool, despite having only moved there from London three years ago

‘Who from?’ I ask.

‘I’m not saying, nosy.’

Veering away from her agenda for Liverpool, she can’t resist telling me that middle age has done absolutely nothing to diminish her allure.

‘I have two lovers,’ she says. ‘They are both bankers — one on Wall Street in New York and the other in London. One is married and the other is not.

‘They know about each other and do not mind sharing me. They have been in my life for more than 20 years. They are very influential. They are my dear friends.’

Her second marriage in 1994 to art dealer Count Nicholas Sokolow ended in divorce after three years. Her third marriage lasted ten years.

‘My marriages have always been about men wanting to control me,’ she says now. ‘I cannot breathe when someone is pulling my strings. But I do not like to dwell on the past — my strategy is always to move forwards.

Savvy: Lady Buck admits she moved to Liverpool for the ‘quality of life’ afforded by lower property prices

‘I may be 55, but I don’t feel invisible to men. On the contrary. Thank goodness I haven’t lost my beauty and I look much younger than my years.

‘I am chatted up all the time. I’m always having to tell men “Please, I am not interested” because I only like men who can challenge my intellect, men of power who I can look up to. I am not interested in young men. Not now, and not then.

‘I make love to a man’s brains, not his body. Being with me is a privilege people have to earn. Sex is only a tiny part of seduction. Wealthy, powerful men look upon women like myself as an investment.

‘I am really enjoying being a single woman. I never feel lonely. I am the most independent woman I know. I enjoy climbing into my bed with its crisp white linen sheets and my dog, who does not snore.

‘I go to the gym, I nurture my mind, I read a lot, I love doing embroidery as I listen to music. I am never alone because I live with my ego.’

Certainly, should she stand for election, Bienvenida has one advantage over the other candidates: she has no embarrassing skeletons left to rattle in her closets. Her life is an open book. Indeed she called it The Making Of A Modern Mistress.

And on the back of her fame (or should that be infamy), 12 years ago she launched one-to-one tutorials entitled The Art of Seduction and Romancing The Rich, costing £5,000 a piece.

‘I killed the project before it even started because women were not prepared to pay £5,000 to become ladies, basically,’ she says dismissively. ‘They would rather spend the money joining a dating agency. They want short cuts.

‘Modern women are not willing to put in the hours studying art and deportment. I never asked a man to buy me jewellery or frivolities. I asked for him to invest in my future with a college course or something else which would improve me.

‘I have no regrets. I am a product of my life and the men who have been there supporting me through thick and thin.

‘If I stand for Mayor, my life will be dissected like a laboratory animal, but you know the advantage with me is that I don’t care. I have nothing to fear because the real men behind me are very powerful and they are there with me. I laugh off insults. No one can touch me. I am not hostage to my past.’

Born Bienvenida Perez-Blanco in a poor quarter of Valencia, her upbringing seems to have left indelible scars. Her mother left her father, a watch repairer, when she was two, then sent Bienvenida to live with her grandmother while she moved from Spain to England for work. The young Bienvenida then spent six miserable years in foster care from the age of ten after her grandmother died.

She was 16 when she joined her mother, who was working as a housekeeper in a smart home for elderly people — but even then she did not receive a warm welcome.

Today, she describes her mother as cold, unloving and a ‘diabolical’ woman. They remain estranged, and Bienvenida says she is grateful she never had children of her own.

‘My mother was never there for me. She didn’t deserve to have me. I have no children because I know I cannot deal with the responsibility.’

Befriended by an aristocratic resident at the home where her mother worked, Bienvenida took her advice to ‘find a husband to look after you’ to heart.
If I stand for Mayor, my life will be dissected like a laboratory animal, but you know the advantage with me is that I don’t care. I have nothing to fear because the real men behind me are very powerful and they are there with me. I laugh off insults. No one can touch me. I am not hostage to my past.

After honing her skills on a series of older men who fell under her spell, she thought she’d found the perfect husband in Sir Anthony Buck, MP for North Colchester, who was 30 years her senior.

‘Sir Anthony was a brilliant man, a highly respected barrister, Minister for the British Navy under Edward Heath. When I married him, it was my dream to have a man of power, of a certain age, that I could look up to,’ she says.

‘But sadly, he never recovered from the divorce from his first wife to whom he’d been married 34 years. He started to drink, and that coupled with the pressures of politics turned him into a very difficult man to live with. The drink took its toll on him, and later on me.’

Bienvenida says she feels no guilt about her affair with Sir Peter Harding, a married father-of-four, and that his resignation was just ‘collateral damage’.

‘I asked Sir Anthony for a divorce within a year of our marriage,’ she continues. ‘I could not cope with his drinking, and then I met Sir Peter. I was the one paying for our relationship financially. I was booking the hotels, entertaining him, giving parties, introducing him to powerful people.

‘And on my birthday, three years later, he did not even bring me a bouquet of flowers.

‘When my husband found out about our affair, he said he was going to tell the Press, instead of giving me the quiet divorce I asked for. It all started from there.’

So, Bienvenida found herself seeking advice and protection from another powerful and influential man, media agent Max Clifford.

‘I am not responsible for other people’s moralities. I am far too busy with my own. Sir Peter should not have taken me for granted,’ she says dismissively. ‘I sleep like a baby at night. I just thank God I survived.’

It took two further marriages for Bienvenida to realise she wasn’t the marrying kind. Her second also ended in scandal and the headline ‘Lady Bucky’s husband cheats with kinky sex queen’.

In 1994, American model and waitress Suzannah Fleming, then aged 39, told a red-top tabloid she’d indulged in shenanigans with the Count — involving leather, high heels and whips — three months after his wedding to Bienvenida

Nor did her third marriage bring her much happiness.

‘We separated in 2005, so I didn’t see him in the three years before he died,’ she says. ‘I couldn’t divorce Eduardo, because sometimes in life it is better not to take drastic measures and we did not want people to gossip.

‘He was a very kind man, a Spanish playboy with a heart of gold, but he didn’t know the meaning of work. I didn’t go to his funeral. I don’t do weddings and funerals or big emotions.’

But is Bienvenida really happy in her new adopted home of Liverpool, with her distant lovers, few friends, no job (she refuses to discuss finances) and mayoral ambitions?

‘I like who I am,’ she says. ‘I can sleep with my conscience and integrity. I do not regret what I had to do to survive. I am proud of the woman that I am today.’

Here’s what other readers have said. Why not add your thoughts, or debate this issue live on our message boards. The comments below have been moderated in advance.

Sounds like Nancy Dell’ollio and looks like Debbie McGee ….. How could any man resist her?

– merka, south coast, 25/2/2012 09:33
Rating   5

“I make love to a man’s brains, not his body. Being with me is a privilege people have to earn. Sex is only a tiny part of seduction. Wealthy, powerful men look upon women like myself as an investment.”- Oh dear! Based on your past performance, current appearance, and the downward trend of your future prospects dear – I think you’ve lost your Triple AAA rating a long time ago!

– Ronnie, Cynical, UK, 25/2/2012 09:26
Rating   14

Saw this specimen in my local market – didn’t bid on her though ..

– Lord Snooty, Chester, 25/2/2012 09:16
Rating   10

I S THIS WOMAN FOR REAL!!!!!!! for a minute i thought it was the 1st april…

– matt, liverpool uk, 25/2/2012 09:16
Rating   10

Well, to all in Liverpool, you should be so proud of this potential candidate!! or not…

– Kim, UK, 25/2/2012 09:13
Rating   5

She looks young? No sorry love you look your age.

– Kay, Garden of England, 25/2/2012 09:06
Rating   15

Forza Bienvenida !!!!!!!!

– Steven, Surrey, 25/2/2012 09:06
Rating   5

I admire her a lot, but why on earth would she want to live in Liverpool when she could live here??

– Jane, Spain, 25/2/2012 08:52
Rating   6

I can think of nobody less qualified to take on civic responsibilities. Someone who reckons taking a bus is going outside her comfort zone, will not be able to handle a single problem that affects folk living in the real world.

– Jen, Gloucester, 25/2/2012 08:50
Rating   8

She has no friends because she’s a man stealer. It’s lock up your husbands when she’s around.

– i Love Cheese, Bucks, 25/2/2012 08:49

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

A LC majority constituency would be winnable as many more people would not mind her background or the moral issues with thye way that wealth was obtained. The serious minded or social class conscious types, even the moral types would not vote for this example of false success. The spiritual implications on a nation would be tolerable at a certain level for a specific type of constituency, but not acceptable to run or represent a country by.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/law-and-order/9110374/UN-drug-gangs-controlling-parts-of-British-cities.html

Note how Scottish visual-materials culture via use-matching of Tartan-Plaid to Burberry’s (or is it Mulberry’s), is affected or even bound to chav culture. Intentional or is it contrived or ‘groomed’ by buying of the same. There are REAL chavs who have taken up on the tartan-plaid-punk meme, and there are false ones possibly the original users of the same material with the intent in putting down the Scots. Subtle but not immediately evident? Think punk bands in ripped batik or such in Malaysia, get the idea? . . . Do refute this postulation otherwise!

Next up, in a time slip, England by sheer similarity of Beefeater, Ushanka-Cossack hat similarities somehow becomes a colony of Moscow . . .

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Psychiatric Drugs in Abusive Psychiatric Establishment – reposted by @AgreeToDisagree – 27th February 2012

In 1% tricks and traps, Abuse of Power, collusion, corruption, domestic terrorists in the political sphere, drug laws, drugs, Ethics, Freedom of Expression, Neurotech, organic psychedelics advocacy, Orwellian, overkill, psychedelics, psychiatry, soul theft, spiritual abuse on February 20, 2012 at 9:35 am

ARTICLE 1

A Proposal for Jenelle’s Law to protect us from brain-damaging neuroleptic drugs

The Antipsychiatry Coalition
P.O. Box 1253, Topeka, Kansas 66601-1253
antipsychiatrycoalition@usa.net

March 14, 2000

The Hon. Diana DeGette
1339 Longworth House Office Building
Washington, DC 20515

Dear Rep. DeGette:

Thank you for your sponsorship of The Patient Freedom from Restraint Act of 1999, H.R. 1313. Physical restraint immobilizing a person at the wrists, ankles, and neck or chest is a kind of torture psychiatrists too often wrongfully inflict on mental patients. I start to panic when I merely think about it being done to me. Thank you for your concern.

Another perhaps even worse horror psychiatrists inflict on people is permanent brain damage caused by neuroleptic drugs.

I recently met a charming young woman named Jenelle Dorner. Her story so moved me that I wrote an account of how she was damaged by neuroleptic drugs and, with her permission, posted it on the Antipsychiatry Coalition web site that I maintain. I’ve enclosed a copy of my article, which I titled “Jenelle’s Story.” Jenelle’s story illustrates what psychiatrist Peter Breggin, M.D., said in his book Psychiatric Drugs: Hazards to the Brain: By using drugs that cause brain damage, “Psychiatry has unleashed an epidemic of neurological disease on the world” one which “reaches 1 million to 2 million persons a year” (Springer, 1983, pp. 109 & 108). Jenelle’s story illustrates the failure of the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) to protect Americans from harmful drugs.

I propose the introduction of legislation to create a federal statute that would require the FDA to withdraw its approval of a drug if the drug causes permanent brain damage evidenced by tardive dyskinesia or dementia in more than 2% or 4% or whatever percent of patients and which would give federal district courts power to order the FDA to withdraw approval of a drug if any person files a civil action for the purpose of proving and does prove that the drug meets the statutory criteria for mandatory withdrawal of FDA approval. And I propose that the law be known as “Jenelle’s Law.”

Please read the attached article and give my proposal careful thought and let me know if you will introduce “Jenelle’s Law” for the purpose of stopping the epidemic of harm now being inflicted on millions of Americans by neuroleptic drugs.

Sincerely,
Douglas A. Smith

http://www.antipsychiatry.org/j-law.htm

Media Clip on Dangers of Xanax (This writer believes that ‘sudden withdrawal’ of medication method was used to intentionally cause a seizure to cause death (where heart stopped or was it lungs paralyzed, probably from drug overload and sudden withdrawal but did not die due to being apracticioner of yogic breathing exercises and being in general good health etc.) at the hands of a local pro-regime psychiatry outfit for activist work on anti-apartheid and perhaps LGBT issues (or being LGBT – more towards ‘Questioning’, but by section 377B’s 20 years and whipping, that regime thought they were being ‘merciful’ or ‘subtle’. To the largely ‘intended as anonymous’ activist who is most probably known to the local populace . . . that regime looks to have ceased this ‘chemical’ based method after implantation of ‘neurotech devices’, or systematic and complete bugging of the activist’s  home, effectively imprisoning via mental duress conditions that has left the activist without any privacy : the activist has contacted the Bar Council in person but has received no response or advice relevant to prevention of further abuse, or removal of the devices implanted in a contrived car  crash early 2000 s . . .   – the spiritual damage caused by poisoning the victim and the poisoners souls has become quite severe on all parties . . . Xanax or any psychiatric drug administered by domestic terrorists dispensing poisons, does not only affect the physical body, but the ethereal and astral bodies, and in spiritually advanced persons who are here on a particular mission (i.e. ending apartheid), the consequences can be particularly disasterous . . . many otherwise viable candidats for politics could be consistently sabotaged in this manner, even throughout the 1st world, be aware and connect the dots before going on that shooting or knifing spree . . .

ARTICLE 2

INFORMED CONSENT: REALITY OR MYTH?

Informed consent represents the single most important issue in the delivery of health care.  Informed consent exists only when there is full disclose of known relevant information and known risk presented to the patient in a manner that they can understand. There are patients who did not understand that the surgical “mastectomy” they agreed to undergo involved removal of their breast.  The text, shown above, a work of fiction by Roger Radford, hit close to home on the subject of adhesive arachnoiditis; a present and real worldwide health care problem.

In the “real world” in which we exist there are often procedural modifiers which influence “full disclosure.”  Some of these have legitimacy and some do not.  It is not unusual to see a court setting as the venue by which resolution of these issues is being attempted.  One such situation is whether a medical treatment or surgery being recommended or performed is “accepted”, “standard” or “approved” and from whence the authority to determine this exists.

The challenge in determining “informed consent” becomes even greater when it becomes apparent that there are significant disparities in the definition of the terms being used.  In fact this confusion may be taken advantage of this to promote secular interests and agendas.  Medical malpractice cases based on informed consent issues (rather than negligence) as sometimes considered to represent the “soft” side of forensic medicine.  This litigation is, however, an important “safety net” for society.  It is unfortunate, but true, that informed consent sometimes been subject to serious abuse for the purpose of personal gain.  Examples of such are failure to make patients aware of minimally invasive uterine artery embolization instead of surgical hysterectomy, minimally invasive aneurysm coiling instead of open cranial surgery and reconstructive spine surgery as opposed to multi-level pedicle screw and rod “fusions.”

It is true that the practice of medicine has never related to certainties. Treatment is based on best information.  Evidence based medicine consists of  careful clinical observation and experience combined with the best scientific data available. The notion that there is no empirical basis upon which to draw valid inferences and render reasonable judgments in the treatment of patients is false. On the other hand there also exists important scientific information which never seems to make itself known to physicians responsible for patient care.  As medical practice progresses in time it becomes smarter and learns of risk factors which were previously unknown or unappreciated.  Sometimes this knowledge is privy to some who purposely do not release it or act to obfuscate it for personal gain.  The actions of the tobacco industry, over the past 50 years, makes this point.  Yet, an important landmark in forensic medicine is “what was known, and when was it known” as a determinant of informed consent.

An interesting example of this is the issue of chronic respiratory disease related to exposure to asbestos fibers.  There is a great deal of ongoing litigation against manufacturers of such products.  For the most part exposure to asbestos occurred during a period of time when neither the manufacturers, the workers or their physicians were unaware of asbestos toxicity.  Where the are the benchmarks?  How can we create expectations which are smarter than we are?

The phenomenon of “managed care” has introduced additional challenges to the concept of “informed consent.”  In their quest to justify denial of coverage for their subscribers many third party payors, seeking an opportunity to say “no” to treatment being recommended for a patient, often use the term “not proven” or “experimental” as a means of denying coverage.  What is the legal ramification of this to the physician recommending treatment?  What are the legal ramifications when care is denied and an alternative treatment goes “wrong.”  Who has the legal responsibility?  Well, up-to-now the physician has been left “blowing in the wind” on this issue.  The “worm ” is, however,  “turning.”  Now that the unique immunity against legal suit provided by ERISA is in the slow process of being stripped away by the courts the health care “playing field” may, finally, become more level.

A level playing field is particularly needed in the arena of informed consent because full disclosure of risk is typically taken to be a medical “right” in the United States (as well as a primary “standard of care”).  This is an interesting phenomenon because this concept varies considerably throughout the world (as demonstrated by the Burton Experience in the Soviet Union in the 1970s).   In the real natural world there are no “rights” for animals (astutely pointed out by Charles Darwin).  If each of us were placed naked in the center of a dense tropical jungle and we had to fend for ourselves we would discover what Darwin had in mind.

As the human race evolved on planet earth only those humans who possessed power had “rights.”  In medieval times only the monarchs and the nobility held “rights.  When the United States was young Thomas Paine and James Madison observed that rights were divided into “natural rights” (i.e. freedom of thought and speech) and “civil rights” (i.e. the right to trial by jury).  Informed consent is a civil right”, more specifically a conceptual “patient right.”   Other important conceptual “patient right” is that of the expectation of being provided with respect and consideration from a heath care system.

The Burton Report® is a strong advocate of real informed consent.  This requires the clear presentation, to a patient, of all significant potential risk.  The Burton Report® is also a strong proponent of providing patients respect and consideration.

Another position of Burton Report® is against the banning of any drug or therapy.  Banning is the making of rules “which are smarter than we are.”  One never knows when a toxic substance can be of benefit (i.e. thalidomide and botox).  The better approach for the patient, and society, is real informed consent.

Clearly, the United States is the world leader in regard to disclosure of risk to patients.  Even so there continues to be serious inadequacies and transgressions of this process which need attention.  This is, at times, difficult to address because the concept of “rights” in the United States has burst asunder to finally reach a level of true frivolity.  Perhaps this should not come as a surprise in a society where legal suits have become, as George F. Will has observed: simply a part of “a great American growth industry, litigation that expresses the belief that everyone has an entitlement to compensation for any unpleasantness.”

When one considers all the attention which has been focused on the issue of informed consent over the past few years it may seem surprising to learn that important areas of medical diagnosis and treatment still exist where full disclosure of risk has never been provided in the past and has continued to be seriously deficient in the present.

A look at the record confirms the point.  Only recently have the adverse effects of particulate radiation, exposure to toxic chemicals and cellular damage resulting from nicotine and carbon monoxide poisoning (from cigarette smoking) been disclosed.  It is important to note that most of this has occurred only as the result of litigation reflecting plaintiff rage and not as a result of governmental or medical intervention.

A good case in point is that of cigarette smoking.  From a medical standpoint, the toxic effects of cigarette smoking appear to represent the single most adverse known chronic health liability, from an external source, directed to the human body.  Remarkably, it has only been since 1997, when, as a direct response to legal actions, the actual ingredients of some cigarettes were finally disclosed to the public.

Once again, were it not for the existence of legal process to unravel the cover-up contrived by the tobacco industry the release of this important information might never have occurred.  One indication of society’s patience wearing thin was the shock therapy administered to the tobacco industry  on June 7, 2001 when a Los Angeles jury awarded $3 billon in punitive damages to a longtime smoker with lung cancer.  A key element in the resolution of this case for the plaintiff was the introduction of a 1972 memo written by a Tobacco Institute executive pointing out how the tobacco industry had successfully undercut public health concerns about the cancer risk of smoking by “creating doubt…without actually denying it” (Geyelin M: Former Two-Pack-a-Day Man Finally Satisfied His Urge to Sue, Wall St. Jour., June 8, 2001).  The fall-out from this decision continues with punitive damages being awarded against the tobacco industry for continuing “nefarious” behavior (Judge awards $15 million in punitive damages in tobacco case against R.J. Reynolds, Associated Press, June 22, 2002).

Most interested patients in the United States today are reasonably cognizant of risk factors as more trustworthy information continues to appear on the internet.  There are, however, a number of areas where informed consent remains, quite remarkably, almost absent.  In fact there are a number of examples of serious health risks which have continued unabated over many years (and sometimes decades).  Many of these are still unassociated with adequate public disclosure and few in the legal profession have yet “stepped up to the plate” to assist in assisting the public interest.

One of the most serious examples of this has been, and continues to be, the disabling complications resulting from the introduction of foreign body substances into the subarachnoid space for the purpose of myelography as well as ill-advised epidural steroid injections. The disease complication is that of clinically significant adhesive arachnoiditis.  This particular entity represents one of the most flagrant examples of a ongoing world-wide serious public health problem due to many years of industry misinformation and cover-up.  Patient suffering secondary to adhesive arachnoiditis serves as a frightening example of an area where, at the beginning of the 21st century it is difficult to find a single patient who has ever been provided with real  informed consent in this area.

What about the physicians?  As adhesive arachnoiditis expert Sarah Smith points out:

“What concerns me is that if the person informing the patient is themselves poorly or inaccurately informed then how on earth can consent ever be truly informed?”

In association with this remain remarkable examples of continuing medical ignorance relating to commonly performed procedures.  Medical informed consent is unlikely when the usual material provided to the public, by their physicians, ignores the most significant risk factors?

No area of informed consent is more important than that of medical research and the involvement of human subjects.  How can patients know the risks if they are basically unknown to science as well as the medical profession?  Unquestionably, gene research will play a very important role in future medical therapy.  Gene therapy represents a challenging voyage into uncharted water where the benefits for all mankind may be historic.  How do we know what we don’t know, and how does informed consent fit into this picture?

Summary:

It is clear that there is no risk-free state in medicine. What then are the risks of surgery? In the field of spine surgery all patients run the risk of dying, being paralyzed, experiencing a nerve injury, wound infection, medical problem, drug reaction, etc. Actually most of these serious risks also exist when the patient drives to the hospital. As an example, the United States government reported that in 1998 alone 41,480 people died from auto accidents.

Informed consent is an essential requirement for the well-being of any modern health care system in the 21st century.  Informed consent is based on full disclosure of known significant risk (the easy part).  Full disclosure of all “relevant information” is the murky component, particularly from the standpoint of jurisprudal  machinations and contrived governmental anomalies.  Informed consent litigation has created a great deal of “busy work” for attorneys.  Much of this litigation has wasted large amounts of time, talent and resource which could have been put to better use in the courtroom by pursuing more important areas of societal need.  The need the create clearly defined requirements for patient protection, taking into account the rapidly changing landscape, is an important  priority for the 21st century.

ARTICLE 3

Lumbo-Sacral Adhesive Arachnoiditis – Introduction

There is no area of medicine today where greater, or more cruel suffering has been created in large populations of patients throughout the globe than those directly related to adhesive arachnoiditis of which the most common form is in the lumbo-sacral area.  Whether due to apathy, disinterest, indifference or self-protective behavior by the medical, scientific and governmental communities lumbo-sacral adhesive arachnoiditis (LSAA) and it’s potential liabilities continues to remain essentially unknown, unreported, and unrecognized among both physicians and patients.

An important reason for this state of affairs has been the pattern of organized  deception and obfuscation in regard to the safety and efficacy of oil myelographic substances such as Pantopaque® and Myodil® perpetrated by some of the originators and manufacturers of iophendylate for over half a century.  This “bodyguard of misrepresentation” and “damage control” by company lawyers has been effective in insuring that governmental agencies, physicians and patients have not been allowed to fully appreciate the risks inherent in introducing highly toxic substances into the sub-arachnoid space.  By not focusing, or adequately propagating, what is known scientifically regarding LSAA it has continued to be a serious world public health challenge and something which is continuously being  perpetrated on unsuspecting patients by their uninformed physicians.

Even today the world community has still not yet come to grips with this cruel phenomenon nor has it yet demonstrated an appropriate social conscience regarding this  disease entity.  LSAA continues to be a trail of tragedy for many unfortunate patients and new cases appear on a regular basis because of our failure to learn from history.  This regrettable situation has tended to cast those health care professionals who have tried to sound this alarm in a role similar to that of Dr. Peter Stockmann, the hero of Hendrik Ibsen’s 1882 play “An Enemy of the People.”

What determines whether or not the pathologic entity LSAA produces significant or disabling pain and neurologic impairment has a lot to do with how active or passive the meningeal reaction is.  Because of the human nervous system’s remarkable abilities to recover from insult if given the opportunity many patients with LSAA are asymptomatic but exist in a precarious balance where things could easily change for the worse if a patient is subject to additional insult.

Remarkably there are still those who actually insist that the pathologic entity LSAA “does not even exist .”  Fortunately these individuals belong to the ever-diminishing circle of those who also believe that:

The Holocaust never happened.
Americans never really landed on the moon (it was staged).
September 11, 2001 was really an Israeli plot.

The saga of adhesive arachnoiditis is not just something of historical interest.  In no area of medicine has failure of “informed consent” been more evident than in the continuing saga of this disease process.  The discussion of this rather incredible and continuing misadventure, which focuses on the  neurotoxicity of foreign body substances being introduced into the subarachnoid space for the purposes of myelography and epidural steroid administration, begins with a review of these subjects:

Myelography

Myelography, is an invasive diagnostic test in which a radio-opaque substance is placed in the subarachnoid space so that the space can be visualized by x-ray. The first contrast material used for this purpose was air. Air myelography developed from innovations in air ventriculography and air encephalography started in 1918, by Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Walter Dandy.  Because air was difficult to visualize on x-ray a search for alternatives began.  In 1932 thorium dioxide (Thorotrast®) was first introduced.  It appeared to be ideal for the purpose of myelography (and other diagnostic studies) and were it not for the fact that it was radioactive it would have been.  Thorium dioxide turned out to be a highly toxic radioactive substance.  It was only 20-30 years after its introduction that the medical profession began to suspect that the sudden and  unusually high incidence of malignancies involving the brain and spinal cord (as well as adhesive arachnoiditis) might be related to thorium dioxide’s radioactivity.  At this point this myelographic agent “fell into disuse.”

Epidural Steroids

The “epidural” space is separated from the subarachnoid space only by the thin dura mater membrane and its associated filamentous pia mater. Epidural steroid administration is an empiric therapeutic modality commonly performed for the treatment of low back disorders. If the steroid is inadvertently injected into the subarachnoid space rather than the epidural space serious disability and incapacitation can result. Although all foreign body substances introduced into the subarachnoid space are “irritating” others can be highly neurotoxic. The most significant example of such neurotoxic agents are those containing ethylene glycols to allow for slow release (i.e. Depo-Medrol® , Depo-Medrone®, Aristocort® and Methylprednisolone Suspension®).  When introduced into the subarachnoid space these materials can be highly neurotoxic and productive of a potentially disabling condition referred to as adhesive arachnoiditis. Since none of these steroids is approved, by their manufacturers, for epidural injection, and that they are clearly know to be toxic if misinjected, it is interesting to note that they still appear to be used by the majority of physicians now performing epidural steroid injections.

A prudent individual would assume that the medical leaders in performing, teaching, and publishing on epidural steroids would be acutely cognizant of the most potentially serious patient complication of “epidural” steroid administration. The facts suggest otherwise.  A prominent medical publisher, publishing 16 spine-related patient manuals including “Lumbar Epidural Injection” and “Cervical Epidural Injection” has, under the section on “risks and complications”, made no mention of adhesive arachnoiditis, the most serious potential complication of epidural steroid administration. This is despite the fact that new cases of incapacitating adhesive arachnoiditis directly related to inadvertent subarachnoid administration of neurotoxic steroids are being diagnosed by spine specialists on a continuing basis.

Are there alternatives to potentially neurotoxic formulations of methyl- prednisolone for epidural administration? Indeed there are. Why are they not used? The best answer is colossal ignorance, indifference, deception, or worse. Methyl prednisolone “suspensions” have neither “fallen into disuse” nor have they been officially identified as being a serious potential risk to the public health in any country at this time.  What does this revelation mean in regard to informed consent?  Might viewing Burton Report® allow patients to ask the right questions as to just which drugs will be injected and techniques used prior to therapy?  Will physicians, because of these questions from informed patients, begin to modify their practice?  We certainly hope so.  It is sad to observe that once again, the public may be forced to call upon the good offices of the legal profession to help in promoting awareness of this clear and present danger because of failure by the health care establishment and elected officials to accept responsibility and become involved.

Intrathecal Catheters

The use of intrathecally placed (within the subarachnoid space) catheters for the purpose of delivering drugs (i.e. morphine for pain relief, baclofin for control of spasm) is not without risk of producing local adhesive arachnoiditis.  These catheters can produce focal adhesive arachnoiditis, cysts and other inflammatory problems.  That such risks exist should be explained to patients as part of the preoperative informed consent process.  It should also be an important part of the risk versus benefit consideration for even considering such therapy in patients with normal life expectancies.

Summary

Clinically significant lumbo-sacral adhesive arachnoiditis is a particularly cruel disease because of the nature of the pain syndrome associated with it.  Yet, its pathophysiology is well understood and is no mystery.  Yet, for those desiring an objective determination of the existence or absence of adhesive arachnoiditis non-invasive high-resolution MRI scans have now allowed definitive determination of this frightening pathologic entity.

The nature of the pain associated with adhesive arachnoiditis is uniquely incapacitating and dolorologists have created the term “regional complex pain disorder” (RCPD) to describe it.  Apologists for those who have created adhesive arachnoiditis and RCPD in patients have pointed out that only 1-5% of those with the condition actually have the full-blown clinical symptoms (which can include progressive neurologic deficit and even death).  The reason for this is interesting and appears to relate to the remarkable ability of the nervous system, with its great reserve and redundancy, to cope with severe insult and injury (if applied in a gradual fashion).  It appears that despite being enmeshed in solid collagenous scar tissue and being deprived of the nurturing of cerebrospinal fluid and its normal vascular supply nerve cells can often achieve a tenuous equilibrium.  This delicate balance can, however, be easily upset by additional insult or injury (i.e. spinal surgery or a motor vehicle accident releasing blood into the subarachnoid space).

There are a number of other neurologic parallels to the phenomenon of nervous system acclimization.  One such is the “post-polio syndrome” where individuals afflicted with poliomyelitis early in life may make complete functional recoveries but as they age they experience progressive weakness.  In this circumstance polio has destroyed the neuronal reserve and normal function belies the fact that there is no reserve.  As the normal process of aging occurs and neurons die by attrition the lack of reserve is evidenced by the inability of the few remaining viable neurons to handle the challenge of normal function.  The human body functions well with only one kidney, one lung etc.  No one would  dare to suggest that the loss of these organs was not inconsequential to the welfare of the individual.  In the case of adhesive arachnoiditis the story has, unfortunately to date,  been different.

Expressions of  plight by individuals suffering with adhesive arachnoiditis are common. The many individuals legitimately suffering from adhesive arachnoiditis often are undiagnosed only because of healthcare establishment inadequacies. The legitimate disability of these unfortunates is then looked upon with distain by the medical and legislative communities who, because of their own diagnostic limitations, tend too often to consider these patients to be malingerers (or worse).  The sad result of this are legions of patients seeking only the dignity of a definitive diagnosis from professional groups and organizations whose skill at evasion and cover-up have unfortunately exceeded their other talents. The disrespectful manner in which many countries have treated these unfortunates, whose only crime was not knowing the right questions to ask before a “minimally invasive” myelogram or epidural steroid injection was performed, has been sad to see.

Sadly, the rare examples where recourse has occurred typically has represented the compassion of the legal profession again serving as a societal “safety net.”  Even so legal attempts at legitimate recourse have been hampered by unrealistic “statue of limitation” requirements.  Unfortunately, tort litigation reform has focused only on limiting the liability of transgressors so that their exposure becomes only a “business expense” and not something which will actually change their behavior.

The Editor, as a health care professional who has been concerned with the subject of neurotoxicity and patients suffering from adhesive arachnoiditis for over a quarter of a century has, as his only excuse for becoming involved in an issue emulating Hendrik Ibsen’s “Enemy of the People”,  is not being “smart enough to know when to quit.”

http://www.burtonreport.com/infforensic/informedconsent.html

ARTICLE 4

Conspiracy Theory on Organic Drugs (if not a neurotech induced thought line) – by @AgreeToDisagree – 20th February 2012

Symbolism of the Opium bed = Psychiatrists couch dawned upon me while doing casual searches for old opium posters.

This is where the drug is administered under neuotech control, to induce neurotech control.

The NLP, perhaps psychic, links are based on/intended for sequestration of Opium’s ‘power’ by HUMAN BEINGS, namely psychiatrists who probably are chemically  (enhanced) tghe same way non-psychiatrists are chemically suppressed so that the SOUL or tretment of SOUL nominally formerly the realm of shamans and soothsayers, are now dominated byu chemiocally drugged up people with no morals.

This allows ‘peaceful feelings’ to become a franchise CONTROLLED by psychiatrists and their drugged up natures (taking drugs to increase telepathy, stronger control of other minds via good drugs), as well as their drugged up (weakened via bad drugs) ‘clients’ who will have to PAY them for their addiction POSING as pharma drugs. This is denounced by ANY and ALL countries which have a legalized drug law. Instead of creating dependency and high fees for profiteering psychiatrists, the honest government legalizes.

The psyche establishment in the 3rd world is thus complicit in addicting populations unawares, perhaps via foods, or other beverages to addict at cost.

How does this theory sound?

America’s Racist Drug Laws – by Stephen Lendman – 2-6-12

In Abuse of Power, advocacy, amendments to law needed, better laws, drug laws, drugs, racism on February 7, 2012 at 4:28 pm

Sentencing Project Executive Director Marc Mauer’s a leading expert on sentencing, race, and criminal justice.

For 25 years, it’s “work(ed) for a fair and effective criminal justice system by promoting reforms in sentencing law and practice, and alternatives to incarceration.”

Criminal injustice is pervasive, especially against people of color. Racial and ethnic minorities comprise over 60% of America’s prison population. “For black males in their twenties, 1 in every 8 is in prison or jail on any given day.”

America’s racist war on drugs disproportionately targets people of color and ethnic minorities. They comprise 75% of those in prison on drug related charges.

On March 17, 2011, Mauer testified before the US Sentencing Commission regarding proposed federal drug offense sentencing guideline amendments to the 2010 Fair Sentencing Act.

He said in 2009, drug offenses accounted for over half (51%) of the federal prison population. Those imprisoned represent a 20-fold increase since 1980. Their numbers exceed those incarcerated in 1980 for all offenses. They’re the most significant source of America’s 700% federal prison growth.

In recent years, state incarcerations stabilized. Federal ones keep rising. Drug related offenses are most responsible. Racial and ethnic minorities are grievously harmed. Reform is urgently needed.

Mandatory minimum sentences exacerbate the problem. So do other racist policies, including judicial unfairness, three strikes and you’re out, get tough on crime policies, and a guilty unless proved innocent mentality.

New York’s 1973 Rockefeller drug laws are most pernicious. Anyone convicted of selling two ounces or more of heroin, morphine, “raw or prepared opium,” cocaine, or cannabis, or possessing four ounces of the same substances receive mandatory 15-year minimum sentences up a maximum of 25 years to life.

In 1979, marijuana possession penalties were reduced from crimes to misdemeanors. However, aggressive pursuit of offenders continues, especially in New York City. More on that below.

Nationwide crack cocaine (vs. powder) and marijuana possession penalties are also pernicious. Until revised under the 2010 Fair Sentencing Act, first time offenders convicted of possessing as little as five grams of crack (one ounce = 28 grams) automatically got five years in prison.

The new law reduces, but doesn’t eliminate, the disparity between crack and powder cocaine. Henceforth, possessing 28 or more grams of crack subjects offenders to penalties up to five years. Mandatory simple possession sentencing ended. In addition, courts may reduce prior sentencing disparities.

Nonetheless, pot busts define America’s drug war. In 2006, Mauer said primary focus since 1990 shifted to marijuana offenses. As a result, they comprised 82% of the increase in drug arrests. Virtually all of them were for possessing small amounts. Enforcement costs are enormous – $4 billion or more annually for marijuana alone.

Under the 1970 federal Controlled Substances Act, cannabis is a Schedule I drug, meaning it’s defined as having high potential for abuse. So far, redefinition attempts failed. In 2001, the Supreme Court ruled against medical marijuana use in United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Cooperative.

In Gonzales v. Raich (2005), the High Court ruled that Congress, under the Constitution’s Commerce Clause, may criminalize the production and use of home-grown cannabis, even where states approve it for medicinal purposes. More on that below.

A Brief History of Legal Cannabis in America

In 1619, Jamestown colonial law required settlers to grow hemp. George Washington grew it as one of his main crops. Its use for rope and fabric was common throughout 18th and 19th century America.

Around 1860, cannabis regulations and restrictions were first instituted. After 1906, states began labeling it poisonous. In the 1920, prohibitions began. By the mid-1930s, all states enacted regulations, including 35 under the Uniform State Narcotic Drug Act. Violators were penalized but not imprisoned.

In the 1970s, communities began abolishing state laws and local regulations banning cannabis possession. Federal laws remain in place. In the 1990s, local sale for medical purposes began even though doing so conflicts with federal law.

Nonetheless, 16 states and the District of Columbia legalized medical marijuana, including Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

Expect others to follow. Possession amounts and other legal provisions vary by state, but the message is clear. Medicinal marijuana works. As a result, criminalizing it harms those dependent for relief.

In addition, it’s a growing revenue source for budget-strapped states. It also produces jobs when they’re most needed. It’s a win-win, regardless of outdated, counterproductive and repressive federal policies.

Efficacious substances should be encouraged, not prohibited. In 1850s America, pharmacies carried medicinal cannabis. Around the same time, states began regulating pharmaceutical sales, including penalties for mislabeling and adulterated substances.

It became a slippery slope toward criminalizing cannabis. Today’s momentum suggests eventual legalization, starting with medicinal use.

Racially Biased New York City Marijuana Policies

In 2008, the New York ACLU published a report titled, “Marijuana Arrest Crusade: Racial Bias and Police Policy in New York City – 1997 – 2007.”

From 1977 – 1986, 33,000 possession arrests were made. Numbers declined to 30,000 from 1987 – 1996. However, from 1997 – 2006, they exploded to 353,000. Today, outside the report’s timeline, they number around 50,000 annually for simple possession of small amounts. More on that below.

US Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas once said:

“As nightfall does not come all at once, neither does oppression. In both instances, there is a twilight when everything remains seemingly unchanged. And it is in such twilight that we all must be aware of change in the air, however slight, lest we become unwitting victims of the darkness.”

In New York City, Blacks and Hispanics are Exhibit A. They’ve been victimized by racist drug enforcement, notably for cannabis possession. From 1997 – 2006, Blacks comprised 52% of arrests, Hispanics another 31%. Whites accounted for 15%.

Those arrested and jailed affected 185,000 Blacks, 110,000 Hispanics, but only 53,000 Whites for minor possession offenses. Most were aged 26 or younger. About 91% were males.

Under Mayor Rudy Giuliani (January 1994 – December 2001), marijuana possession arrests exploded 10-fold. Under Mayor Michael Bloomberg (January 2002 – present), they’re higher than ever. At the same time, New York police provide little information. As a result, few New Yorkers know their city conducts “a historically unprecedented marijuana arrest crusade.”

Cops involved up to top commanders benefit. Marijuana busts are safe. Involved officers and supervisors accrue overtime pay, and produce numbers showing productivity. [[[ *** All a waste of energy compared to a singl legalize bill with price controls as well *** ]]]

In contrast, those arrested are harmed even if not prosecuted. Procedures include handcuffing, fingerprinting, photographing, and potentially obtaining DNA samples. Often people with no criminal records are affected. Henceforth they’ll have one and plenty of baggage.

Whether or not convicted, employment and educational opportunities, mortgages or other loans, public housing benefits, licenses, travel visas, and good credit standing are at risk.

Moreover, arrests and overnight custody alone are humiliating, degrading, alienating and unjust for possessing small amounts of controlled substances, especially marijuana that long ago should have been legalized.

Last September, New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly responded to public pressure. As a result, he ordered commanders not to arrest people possessing small marijuana amounts unless they’re in public view.

In 1979, New York state decriminalized amounts of 25 grams or less. Henceforth, displaying it publicly became low-level misdemeanors, subject to ticketing, not arrests or jailing.

New York City’s stop-and-frisk policy drew widespread criticism. Mostly Black and Hispanic males are targeted. Police routinely confront them, demand their pockets be emptied, and if marijuana is displayed, they’re arrested for having it in public view. As a result, around 50,000 annually are criminalized unjustly.

At the time, critics called Kelly’s action important. Chief Legal Aid Society attorney Steven Banks said it would make a tremendous difference to wrongfully targeted young minorities.

Drug Policy Alliance executive director Ethan Nadelmann called the order a significant change in how police deal with minor marijuana possession cases. Hopefully, “gross racial disparity” would be curbed.

Kelly’s order in part read:

“Questions have been raised about the processing of certain marijuana arrests.” Henceforth, “(a) crime will not be charged to an individual who is requested or compelled to engage in the behavior that results in the public display of marijuana.” Displaying it must be “actively undertaken of the subject’s own volition.”

Queens College sociologist Harry G. Levine said public defenders and legal aid lawyers estimate up to three-fourths of those arrested displayed it on police orders. Those affected don’t know they’re illegal, but police are very intimidating.

Last year, Brooklyn Democratic assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries and Republican Senator Mark Grisanti sponsored legislation to downgrade small possession public displays from misdemeanors to a lessor violations. Bloomberg opposed them, claiming it would encourage greater use.

Despite Kelly’s order, marijuana arrests declined slightly but continue. So does NYPD’s racist crusade. Bloomberg supports it. So does Kelly tacitly. In 2010, one in every seven city arrests were for displaying marijuana in public view. Illegal police searches and false charges were mostly responsible.

Last year, New York’s illegal stop-and-frisk policy affected over 600,000 people, overwhelmingly young Black and Hispanic males. Despite Kelly’s order, illegal arrests continue. Institute for Juvenile Reform and Alternatives member Chino Hardin said “build(ing) a movement to stop” New York’s crusade is essential.

On December 8, the ACLU called “NYPD Pot Arrests Habit….Tough to Break,” saying:

Police Commissioner Kelly’s order lowered arrests slightly, but maintained New York’s distinction as “the marijuana arrest capital of the world. This just won’t do.”

City Hall policy is at fault. People of color are aggressively targeted for petty offenses like “graffiti, disorderly conduct, and – you guessed it – minor marijuana possession.”

Ingrained habits are hard to break. Kelly’s order lacked teeth, especially without City Hall’s endorsement.

As a result, New York Black and Hispanic youths face unrelenting persecution unless public pressure forces legislative relief. It’s long overdue nationwide with teeth.

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago and can be reached at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net.

Also visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com and listen to cutting-edge discussions with distinguished guests on the Progressive Radio News Hour on the Progressive Radio Network Thursdays at 10AM US Central time and Saturdays and Sundays at noon. All programs are archived for easy listening.

http://www.progressiveradionetwork.com/the-progressive-news-hour/

 

 

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

1) New York’s 1973 Rockefeller drug laws are most pernicious. Anyone convicted of selling two ounces or more of heroin, morphine, “raw or prepared opium,” cocaine, or cannabis, or possessing four ounces of the same substances receive mandatory 15-year minimum sentences up a maximum of 25 years to life.

Someone gets high for a day for using what he grew that Mother Nature provided, then all the taxpayers get to support his a$$ for life? Keep at it USA, this way we can be sure that USA will never be a viable super power, all the money is spent on prisons and all the population is in prison. Meanwhile the Senate or Congress or what not enjoys whatever psychedelics they like at parties, the double standards are unbelievable . . .

2) In addition, it’s a growing revenue source for budget-strapped states. It also produces jobs when they’re most needed. It’s a win-win, regardless of outdated, counterproductive and repressive federal policies.

Supporting a supposed ‘criminal’s’ (who decides what is criminal?) a$$ in prison is NOT A JOB that any self respecting person weant to do. It may pay well but only the most corruoted souls on the planet would want to do that sort of job. Even the homeless and beggars have more dignity and principles, get a REAL job so-called government employees, and the state should produce REAL jobs . . . enriching prison contractors is just institutionalized corruption . . . USA sucks, and the writer sucks for sayong jobs are produced when the economy is being destroyed and productivity is wasted, human rights abused . . .

3) In Gonzales v. Raich (2005), the High Court ruled that Congress, under the Constitution’s Commerce Clause, may criminalize the production and use of home-grown cannabis, even where states approve it for medicinal purposes. More on that below.

Who are these ‘high court’ people? Who are their affiliates? What phenotypes are they of? Who are their business partners and friends, fellow colluders? Identify all these groups and the neo-feudalist, lack of neutrality/democracy faction of the USA is exposed. Voters must find this out and make sure that these people from above groups are NEVER voted into power or heck, even promoted into positions of power like ‘High Court’. These are plants that grow on their own, and have been placed there by ‘God’ if you believe in ‘God’, for humanity to use. No group of people have authority, least of all by threat of incarceration or arms to prevent any person from using these things. Barring the ‘psychic’ issue which doubtless can be worked around with secure usage facilities and perhaps specialty districts, there is no democratic or human rights basis for preventing people from using psychedelics AS per their desire and with informed consent

4) Despite Kelly’s order, marijuana arrests declined slightly but continue. So does NYPD’s racist crusade. Bloomberg supports it. So does Kelly tacitly. In 2010, one in every seven city arrests were for displaying marijuana in public view. Illegal police searches and false charges were mostly responsible. Last year, New York’s illegal stop-and-frisk policy affected over 600,000 people, overwhelmingly young Black and Hispanic males. Despite Kelly’s order, illegal arrests continue. Institute for Juvenile Reform and Alternatives member Chino Hardin said “build(ing) a movement to stop” New York’s crusade is essential.

Ok so 3 abusers have been fingered here. Mayor Bloomberg, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and Youth Organizer and Campaign Coordinator for the Prison Moratorium Project Chino Hardin. Kick them out of office by not voting them where they cannot use the vast powers of government to harm ordinary people looking to enjoy a simple high. It’s just a high. In Chino’s case set up a parallel but opposing Institution At most offer, ‘Psychedelics use rooms’ where the users can isolate themselves and when sobered up can go out again to live a normal life. Itt is unconscionable to arrest then burden the taxpayers.

Caught with six kilos of cannabis and you could still avoid jail By Tom Whitehead, Home Affairs Editor 12:01AM GMT 24 Jan 2012

In Uncategorized on January 24, 2012 at 8:31 am

Drug runners and dealers could avoid prison even if caught with heroin, cocaine or thousands of pounds worth of cannabis.

Sentencing guidelines issued today say that offenders who play a “limited” role in gangs could face community orders for intent to supply Class A drugs.

Dealers caught with 6kg of cannabis, valued at £17,000 and enough to fill 30,000 joints or keep an average user in supply for 17 years, could also avoid prison.

The sentences on drug “mules” will be cut substantially, while workers in small cannabis “farms” could escape custody.

Courts will be told for the first time to reduce sentences for cannabis possession if it is being used for medicinal purposes.

The guidelines maintain tough sentences for gang leaders and those who sell directly to the public, especially to children.

Rank and file police leaders said the guidelines were “daft” and warned that gang leaders would be able to escape jail by claiming that they were lesser members.

Peter Smyth, the chairman of the Metropolitan branch of the Police Federation, said: “How can a court be expected to differentiate between the person who says I am very low in the chain and those high up?

“No matter how big a role I played, if I was in their shoes and arrested for drugs I would say I was a low-level player or forced into it. If they can see a loophole then of course they will go through it.”

The guidelines, which come into effect next month, have been drawn up by the Sentencing Council and detail how the role and quantity of drugs should impact on sentencing.

They were written after research for the council concluded that the public had “little support” for custody for possession offences or long prison terms for “small-scale supply” offences.

The publication comes after Sir Richard Branson, the Virgin chief executive, said in The Daily Telegraph that drugs should be decriminalised to free the police to tackle other crimes.

Under the guidelines, courts are being told to treat those who perform “lesser” roles more leniently. They include minor members of drug-dealing gangs, such as a runner who ferries drugs from one gang member to another, someone who has “no influence on those above in the chain” or someone who has been coerced.

Low-level operatives caught with 6kg of cannabis, 20 Ecstasy tablets, valued at £80, or five grams of heroin, valued at £300, or five grams of cocaine, valued at £250, are likely to receive a community sentence.

People who supply similar amounts to friends for no personal gain could also avoid prison.

The amounts have been significantly reduced since the Sentencing Council published draft guidelines last year when the levels proposed were 50 grams of Class A drugs and up to 99 Ecstasy pills.

The final document also stressed that those who supplied directly to drug users and for a profit, such as street dealers or more significant criminals in the drug trade, could expect prison sentences.

Those selling Class A drugs face a starting point of four and a half years, with up to 16 years for a single incident, depending on the quantity of drugs involved.

For the first time, anyone dealing to those aged under 18 will also face tougher treatment by judges.

Offenders in a leading role in the production or cultivation of 11lb (5kg) of heroin or cocaine or tens of thousands of Ecstasy tablets could face up to 16 years in prison, with a starting point of 14 years’ custody.

Those producing industrial quantities of cannabis for commercial purposes could also face up to 10 years in jail under the new guidelines.

Minor members of gangs operating cannabis farms of up to 28 plants could be given a community penalty.

The guidelines also state that possessing cannabis “to help with a diagnosed medical condition” is a mitigating factor.

Drug “mules” who can argue they were vulnerable targets and exploited by organised gangs may also receive a lighter sentence.

Such offenders, often women forced or tricked into the crime, caught bringing in up to 1kg of Class A drugs would face a starting point of six years instead of the 11 for those playing a more significant role in the trafficking.

Lord Justice Hughes, the deputy chairman of the Sentencing Council, said: “Drug offending has to be taken seriously. Drug abuse underlies a huge volume of acquisitive and violent crime and dealing can blight communities.

“Offending and offenders vary widely so we have developed these guidelines to ensure there is effective guidance for sentencers and clear information for victims, witnesses and the public on how drug offenders are sentenced.

“Drug dealers can expect substantial jail sentences.”

The Association of Chief Police Officers said the move offered police “consistent guidance yet still provides the courts with flexibility to deal with each case on its own merits where appropriate”.

Martin Barnes, the chief executive of DrugScope, said: “We have long had concerns about the numbers of women involved in low-level supply and other offences as a result of violence and intimidation: far too many end up in the courts and in our prisons.

“We believe that these guidelines are a positive step forward in addressing this problem.”

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

The whole drugs industry could be destroyed if they teach people how to grow their own (no more crime to gain money to buy – they’ll learn to grow and wait for the leaves and sap to mature etc..) AND make drugs available from government as well, at dirt cheap prices. Further impositions of social culture based discouragement (never prohibit but actively discourage) such as making drug users not be allowed to serve in the NON-CONSCRIPTED army, or drug users not be allowed to enter honour/awards rolls of the non-user demographic – i.e. we have discipline and are thus better, that sort of thing. ‘Soft power’. Because ‘hard power’ is too much fun, drug wars are just too engaging, make it legal and a culture or status issue and the whole thing ends though one might say that people will end up being stoned and farming more, not very productive but better than destructive crime.

Don’t jail at all simply because it costs too much, these are not violent criminals who need physical walls and bars to keep them from harming others, but do assign them to gardening related work instead of prison at all, if prison is just an excuse for brainwash sessions.

In the Dogg house: Snoop is arrested for marijuana possession after sniffer dog weeds out stash – by Mike Larkin – Last updated at 1:33 AM on 10th January 2012

In Uncategorized on January 10, 2012 at 10:41 am

Snooping around: Snoop Dogg, pictured here in 2007, was arrested for marijuana possession after a sniffer dog found his stash in Texas on Saturday

Snooping around: Snoop Dogg, pictured here in 2006, was arrested for marijuana possession after a sniffer dog found his stash in Texas on Saturday

He has courted controversy in recent weeks after apparently smoking a joint on stage and recording a music video where he sits next to a small mountain of marijuana.

But it seems Snoop Dogg’s obsession with the drug has came back to haunt him, as he has been arrested and charged after sniffer dog sniffed out his stash in his tour bus.

The 40-year-old rapper was arrested in Sierra Blanca, Texas after his transport was stopped at a Border Patrol checkpoint at 3am on Saturday.

Ironically it is the same checkpoint where country singer Willie Nelson was busted for possessing marijuana in 2010, who the hip hop star vigorously defended.

A Sheriff’s Office spokesman said: ‘During a routine check of U.S. citizenship the inspecting Border Patrol agent detected the odor of marijuana emitting from the inside of the vehicle and requested the driver to pull into the secondary inspection lane for further inspection.

‘The agent requested all subjects to exit the bus so that a canine working the checkpoint could conduct an inspection of the vehicle.

‘Upon entering the bus the canine alerted to a trashcan located at the rear of the vehicle where a red prescription bottle containing rolled marijuana cigarettes were located.

‘A further search produced two other containers containing marijuana weighing in all total of 0.130 lbs.’

And the rap legend did not try to pin the blame on someone else, according to the lawmen.

The spokesman added: ‘Calvin C. Broadus a.k.a. Snoop Dogg freely admitted that the marijuana belonged to him and he was placed under arrest by U.S. Border Patrol agents and detained

‘At approximately 4:00am Hudspeth County Sheriff’s Office was contacted and upon arrival, Mr. Broadus was cited for possession of drug paraphernalia.’

He was released after being told he has to make a court appearance on or before January 20, 2012.

The Mail contacted Snoop’s representatives, but has yet to receive a response.

When Nelson was arrested at the same checkpoint in 2010 Snoop said: ‘They better leave Willie the f*** alone.’

Snoop has a long history of legal problems, including a 1993 murder charge, from which he was eventually acquitted, numerous convictions for marijuana possession and in 2007 he was given a given a three-year suspended sentence after pleading no contest to possessing a gun and drugs.

His arrest comes after he announced he wanted to speak to Barack Obama in a smoky room so he could ask him to legalise his favourite drug.

In an interview on Hot 99.5 he said: ‘Before I even said “Hi” to President Obama, I would change the aroma of the room.

‘And then we could start conversing after we had that aroma change. You know what I’m talking about?’

The arrest comes after her raised eyebrows by sitting with a giant stash what seemed to be the drug as he recorded a music video for Smokin’ On with his chum Wiz Khalifa.
Smokin’: Snoop Dogg and Wiz Khalifa appeared to be in their element as they sat with a massive pile of ‘weed’ as they filmed a music video together

Smokin’: Snoop Dogg and Wiz Khalifa appeared to be in their element as they sat with a massive pile of ‘weed’ as they filmed a music video together

He was so pleased he took to Twitter to boast about the copious quantity of the ‘weed,’ which he will no doubt argue was not the real thing and just a prop.

Linking to a picture of the small mountain of the green substance, he said: ‘Wat a trophy.’

He was recording the music video for the soundtrack song from his upcoming stoner comedy Mac and Devon Go to High School.

And the hunky hip-hop hero seemed to be intent on looking his best for the shoot, as before he started lip-syncing a lacky was seen giving his hair a final gentle tease before the take began.
He’s a big teaser: No doubt Saxon would approve of the finishing touches being made to Snoop’s barnet

He’s a big teaser: No doubt Saxon would approve of the finishing touches being made to Snoop’s barnet

Ready to go: Snoop’s chum lights up as they begin to lip-sync their performance for the video

He certainly seemed to be enjoying himself as he recorded the video, which he will no doubt be hoping will help fire interest in a film which was originally intended to be a direct-to-DVD release.

In the flick Wiz stars as senior valedictorian Devin who obsessed with academic success.

However her begins to loosen up after meeting Snoop Dogg’s Mac, a teenage student who is street smart, but under performs at school.

Of course copious amounts of marijuana aid the pair in their bonding sessions.
Bad boys: But the pair are starring together as a classic odd couple in the flick Mac and Devon Go To High School

Bad boys: But the pair are starring together as a classic odd couple in the flick Mac and Devon Go To High School

Here’s what other readers have said. Why not add your thoughts, or debate this issue live on our message boards.

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

This guy based his whole career around weed references. I can’t really blame the cops for targeting him.

– Bubba, Brooklyn, NY, USA, 10/1/2012 04:12
Rating   43

Looks like some banging chronic on the table… If he like’s burning tree’s thats his business,what’s the big deal,society has far more serious issue’s to deal with…

– Benny Hill, Bristol City….., 10/1/2012 02:12
Rating   178

Right, because a rich recording artist is a danger to the community. What nonesense!!!

– Anna, Miami, USA, 10/1/2012 02:01
Rating   155

It’s sad what America has become. Randomly stopped by the border patrol even though you’re not crossing any border. The next thing you know you’re in jail for some pot – so, it’s not really just a ‘routine check of US citizenship’ like they say. If that was the case there would be no reason to have a drug sniffing dog working the checkpoint. Regardless of what you think about pot this should upset anyone who believes in basic rights and freedoms.

– Pepper Sanchez, Tristan da Cunha, 10/1/2012 01:46
Rating   109

Some rolemodels huh..Money does not make you stand above the law as some daft people seems to believe.

– mark, south, 10/1/2012 01:41
Rating   77

Welcome to the stone age of Texas… SORRY!!! UR now SCREWED!

– Mark, Texas, where 79 people were murdered for believing in GOD!, 10/1/2012 00:23
Rating   65

That’s terrible, but not surprising. The south does not pretend to tolerate marijuana use. Texas especially will prosecute users of the herb the same as though they were violent criminals. While it isn’t right, they are quite open about their abusive laws and penalties. Someone with Snoop’s habits should stay in the friendlier states and keep a medical license. I wouldn’t advise Snoop to travel to Dubai either.

– Ann, CA, USA, 09/1/2012 23:42

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Snoop should use this opportunity (with all that wealth he has) to challenge the unconstitutionality of the charges, of the unconstitutionality of the ban on all organic psychedelics which are after all freely given in nature.

No group of people have a right to forbid any from using what is freely available or growing in nature. If the case fails (doubtful) as so many people do use organics, Snoop should demand that he be allowed to renounce the US citizenship and seek asylum in a country of his choice where organics are legal.

Do it Snoop, fight for democracy, for the right to use what Nature has given us for free! Don’t be a victim or a legal-system wuss Snopp, challenge the system on a Human Rights angle to use what nature has freely given mankind ! USA! USA! Pull a MLK on the system Snoop! Make them regret even daring to target you!