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Posts Tagged ‘prison contractor collusion’

‘Sadistic and surpassed belief’: Evil pair jailed for MINIMUM of 55 years for torturing 15-year-old boy to death after accusing him of being a witch – by Amy Oliver – Created 1:05 PM on 5th March 2012

In better judgments, England, Justice, taxpayer funds on March 7, 2012 at 4:40 pm

Eric Bikubi ordered to serve at least 30 years and Maglie Bamu a minimum of 25 years
Bikubi told Kristy and siblings to jump out of the window to see if they could fly during abuse
Judge says the belief in witchcraft, however genuine, could not be an excuse
Judge agrees the couple also attacked Kristy’s sisters but would not pass separate sentences
Kristy’s father Pierre said his son died in ‘unimaginable circumstances at the hands of people he loved and trusted’

A couple were today jailed for life for the ‘sadistic’ torture and drowning a teenage boy they accused of being a witch.

Kristy Bamu, 15, died on Christmas day 2010 after suffering four days of horrific abuse at the hands of his sister Magalie, 29, and her partner, Eric Bikubi, 28, in their flat in Newham, east London.

The pair used weapons including a metal bar, hammer, chisel, pliers and even heavy ceramic floor tiles to inflict 130 injuries on Kristy, after he refused to say he was a witch.

Jailed: Eric Bikubi, left, and his partner Magalie Bamu, right, were both jailed for life today for the horrific torture of Magalie’s brother Kristy, which led to his death

Jailed: Eric Bikubi, left, and his partner Magalie Bamu, right, were both jailed for life today for the horrific torture of Magalie’s brother Kristy, which led to his death

The teenager eventually drowned in the bath in front of his four terrified siblings as Bikubi hosed them down with freezing water in an abhorrent ‘cleansing’ ritual.

Football coach Bikubi and Magalie were found guilty of murder at the Old Bailey last week.
Today Bikubi was ordered to serve at least 30 years and Bamu a minimum of 25 years.

Sentencing, Judge David Paget told the couple the case was particularly serious and involved sadistic behaviour.

‘It was prolonged torture involving metal and physical suffering being inflicted before death,’ he said adding: ‘I am in no doubt that this murder did involve a sadistic element.’

He told Bikubi that he accepted his mental damage may have made him more inclined to believe Kristy was a witch and a threat to the young child of the family.

Victim: 15-year-old Kristy Bamu, pictured left with a friend, suffered 130 injuries after being hit with an arsenal of weapons including broken ceramic floor tiles

But added: ‘The belief in witchcraft, however genuine, cannot excuse an assault to another person, let alone the killing of another human being.’

He told Magalie he did not accept her denial of belief in witchcraft and that she was forced to attack Kristy by Bikubi.

‘It is only explicable if you shared Eric Bikubi’s belief. It provides some explanation for what happened, but it does not excuse it,’ he told her.

Judge Paget said the couple had also attacked Kristy’s sisters but he would not pass separate sentences for that.

In court: Kelly Bamu, pictured on the witness stand, said Kristy asked for forgiveness. ‘He asked again and again,’ she said, adding ‘Magalie did absolutely nothing. She didn’t give a damn’

In court: Kelly Bamu, pictured on the witness stand, said Kristy asked for forgiveness. ‘He asked again and again,’ she said, adding ‘Magalie did absolutely nothing. She didn’t give a damn’

He added: ‘The ordeal they were subjected to almost surpasses belief.’

Kristy had come to London from Paris with his two brothers and two sisters to spend the festive season with Magalie.

But things turned sour when Kristy wet himself and the couple, who were said to be obsessed with witchcraft known as kindoki in their native Democratic Republic of Congo, accused him of witchcraft.

Bikubi, a heavily-built sportsman, accused the teenager of trying to control another child in the house and of orchestrating a series of unlucky events, the court had heard.

He punched, kicked and headbutted his victim before beating him with a metal weight-lifting bar ‘as hard as he could’ and knocking out his teeth with a hammer.

Violent evidence: Kristy suffered 130 injuries after being tortured for four days with weapons including broken ceramic floor tiles

Witchcraft: These weapons were found at the scene in what officers called an ‘unprecedented scenario’

Evidence: Officers found a whole array of weapons in the flat, including pliers, a pole, and a piece of wood

Terrible death: Kristy’s last words were ‘I just want to die now’ before he slipped underneath the water in the bath

In one act of savage cruelty, as Kristy’s siblings were hit, forced to join in and help clear the blood, Magalie ripped apart one of his ears with a pair of pliers.

At one point, Bikubi told the youngsters to jump out of the window to see if they could fly, the court heard.

Five hours of desperate phone calls were made to Kristy’s parents in Paris but at first they did not believe their children and were then unable to travel because of the Christmas break.

On Christmas Day, with his face beaten to a barely recognisable pulp, Kristy was thrown into a bath.

His last words were ‘I just want to die now’ before slipping underneath the water.

Kristy’s sister Kelly, now 21, broke down several times in court as she relived the terror. She said: ‘It was as if they (Bikubi and Magalie) were obsessed by witchcraft. They decided we had come there to kill them.’

Kelly added: ‘Kristy asked for forgiveness. He asked again and again. Magalie did absolutely nothing. She didn’t give a damn. She said we deserved it.’

In mitigation Henry Grunwald QC, for Bikubi, said: ‘What happened would not have ended as it did had it not been for Mr Bikubi’s mental impairment.’

Shocking: This was the squalid and bloodstained scene police were confronted by when they discovered the killing of Kristy Bamu by his sister and her partner in Newham, east London

Scene of the crime: Kristy was forced to pray for deliverance for four days and deprived of food and water

While Philippa McAlasney QC, for Magalie, said: ‘Not only has she has lost her entire family, she faces a solitary life in prison.’

Kristy’s father, Pierre, said in a statement: ‘Kristy died in unimaginable circumstances at the hands of people he loved and trusted – people we all loved and trusted.

‘I feel betrayed. To know that Kristy’s own sister, Magalie, did nothing to save him makes the pain that much worse.’

Scotland Yard has investigated 83 cases involving abuse resulting from ritualistic or faith-based beliefs, and brought 17 prosecutions, over the last 10 years.

Detective Superintendent Terry Sharpe said: ‘This is a hidden and under-reported crime and therefore difficult to deal with in terms of protecting potential victims from harm.

IMMIGRANTS IN THE GRIP OF ‘FERAL SUPERSTITION’

Christian fundamentalist pastors in Britain are fuelling the belief in witchcraft, experts have warned.

Dr Richard Hoskins, a police adviser, said he has spoken to many immigrant Londoners gripped by the potential power of malicious ‘spirits’ threatening to damage their families.

Traditional methods of exorcism include wearing a charm, fasting or sacrificing an animal and are controlled by the Church.

The university lecturer warned that Christian extremists and evangelists have begun taking advantage of vulnerable families and perpetuating beliefs in witchcraft by offering expensive ‘deliverance services’.

Dr Hoskins said: ‘What seems to happen is that there is this dislocation and, in this case, something feral and wild. It is completely out of control.’

The issue was first highlighted by the case of eight-year-old Victoria Climbie in 2000. Victoria, who travelled to Britain from the Ivory Coast, died at the hands of her aunt and her boyfriend after being branded a witch.

A year later the torso of a Nigerian boy, named Adam by police, was found in the Thames after he was ritually sacrificed.

Police believe he may have been killed by someone with a terminal illness who believed his murder would save them.

In 2005, three people were convicted of beating, cutting and rubbing chilli peppers in the eyes of an eight-year-old Angolan girl to ‘beat the devil out of her’.

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

Life for life as will be judged and decided by the victim’s family, if not after determining that the victim’s family is not incapable of making judgment the judge instead. Or if the victim survived, the victim gets to decide to torture in the same manner. Otherwise let the creeps go or shoot them if they appear to be likely to kill more people and show not remorse etc… 55 years x 2 people x 40K a year will make these offenders cost the English taxpayers 4.4 million pounds, something both victim and offenders AND the entire families of both victim and offenders AS WELL would not earn even in 55 years.

Wakey wakey, or is that perfumed and rollered wig, black robes and massive dais mounted podium desk, making thinking too difficult for the judge?

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America’s Racist Drug Laws – by Stephen Lendman – 2-6-12

In Abuse of Power, advocacy, amendments to law needed, better laws, drug laws, drugs, racism on February 7, 2012 at 4:28 pm

Sentencing Project Executive Director Marc Mauer’s a leading expert on sentencing, race, and criminal justice.

For 25 years, it’s “work(ed) for a fair and effective criminal justice system by promoting reforms in sentencing law and practice, and alternatives to incarceration.”

Criminal injustice is pervasive, especially against people of color. Racial and ethnic minorities comprise over 60% of America’s prison population. “For black males in their twenties, 1 in every 8 is in prison or jail on any given day.”

America’s racist war on drugs disproportionately targets people of color and ethnic minorities. They comprise 75% of those in prison on drug related charges.

On March 17, 2011, Mauer testified before the US Sentencing Commission regarding proposed federal drug offense sentencing guideline amendments to the 2010 Fair Sentencing Act.

He said in 2009, drug offenses accounted for over half (51%) of the federal prison population. Those imprisoned represent a 20-fold increase since 1980. Their numbers exceed those incarcerated in 1980 for all offenses. They’re the most significant source of America’s 700% federal prison growth.

In recent years, state incarcerations stabilized. Federal ones keep rising. Drug related offenses are most responsible. Racial and ethnic minorities are grievously harmed. Reform is urgently needed.

Mandatory minimum sentences exacerbate the problem. So do other racist policies, including judicial unfairness, three strikes and you’re out, get tough on crime policies, and a guilty unless proved innocent mentality.

New York’s 1973 Rockefeller drug laws are most pernicious. Anyone convicted of selling two ounces or more of heroin, morphine, “raw or prepared opium,” cocaine, or cannabis, or possessing four ounces of the same substances receive mandatory 15-year minimum sentences up a maximum of 25 years to life.

In 1979, marijuana possession penalties were reduced from crimes to misdemeanors. However, aggressive pursuit of offenders continues, especially in New York City. More on that below.

Nationwide crack cocaine (vs. powder) and marijuana possession penalties are also pernicious. Until revised under the 2010 Fair Sentencing Act, first time offenders convicted of possessing as little as five grams of crack (one ounce = 28 grams) automatically got five years in prison.

The new law reduces, but doesn’t eliminate, the disparity between crack and powder cocaine. Henceforth, possessing 28 or more grams of crack subjects offenders to penalties up to five years. Mandatory simple possession sentencing ended. In addition, courts may reduce prior sentencing disparities.

Nonetheless, pot busts define America’s drug war. In 2006, Mauer said primary focus since 1990 shifted to marijuana offenses. As a result, they comprised 82% of the increase in drug arrests. Virtually all of them were for possessing small amounts. Enforcement costs are enormous – $4 billion or more annually for marijuana alone.

Under the 1970 federal Controlled Substances Act, cannabis is a Schedule I drug, meaning it’s defined as having high potential for abuse. So far, redefinition attempts failed. In 2001, the Supreme Court ruled against medical marijuana use in United States v. Oakland Cannabis Buyers’ Cooperative.

In Gonzales v. Raich (2005), the High Court ruled that Congress, under the Constitution’s Commerce Clause, may criminalize the production and use of home-grown cannabis, even where states approve it for medicinal purposes. More on that below.

A Brief History of Legal Cannabis in America

In 1619, Jamestown colonial law required settlers to grow hemp. George Washington grew it as one of his main crops. Its use for rope and fabric was common throughout 18th and 19th century America.

Around 1860, cannabis regulations and restrictions were first instituted. After 1906, states began labeling it poisonous. In the 1920, prohibitions began. By the mid-1930s, all states enacted regulations, including 35 under the Uniform State Narcotic Drug Act. Violators were penalized but not imprisoned.

In the 1970s, communities began abolishing state laws and local regulations banning cannabis possession. Federal laws remain in place. In the 1990s, local sale for medical purposes began even though doing so conflicts with federal law.

Nonetheless, 16 states and the District of Columbia legalized medical marijuana, including Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington.

Expect others to follow. Possession amounts and other legal provisions vary by state, but the message is clear. Medicinal marijuana works. As a result, criminalizing it harms those dependent for relief.

In addition, it’s a growing revenue source for budget-strapped states. It also produces jobs when they’re most needed. It’s a win-win, regardless of outdated, counterproductive and repressive federal policies.

Efficacious substances should be encouraged, not prohibited. In 1850s America, pharmacies carried medicinal cannabis. Around the same time, states began regulating pharmaceutical sales, including penalties for mislabeling and adulterated substances.

It became a slippery slope toward criminalizing cannabis. Today’s momentum suggests eventual legalization, starting with medicinal use.

Racially Biased New York City Marijuana Policies

In 2008, the New York ACLU published a report titled, “Marijuana Arrest Crusade: Racial Bias and Police Policy in New York City – 1997 – 2007.”

From 1977 – 1986, 33,000 possession arrests were made. Numbers declined to 30,000 from 1987 – 1996. However, from 1997 – 2006, they exploded to 353,000. Today, outside the report’s timeline, they number around 50,000 annually for simple possession of small amounts. More on that below.

US Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas once said:

“As nightfall does not come all at once, neither does oppression. In both instances, there is a twilight when everything remains seemingly unchanged. And it is in such twilight that we all must be aware of change in the air, however slight, lest we become unwitting victims of the darkness.”

In New York City, Blacks and Hispanics are Exhibit A. They’ve been victimized by racist drug enforcement, notably for cannabis possession. From 1997 – 2006, Blacks comprised 52% of arrests, Hispanics another 31%. Whites accounted for 15%.

Those arrested and jailed affected 185,000 Blacks, 110,000 Hispanics, but only 53,000 Whites for minor possession offenses. Most were aged 26 or younger. About 91% were males.

Under Mayor Rudy Giuliani (January 1994 – December 2001), marijuana possession arrests exploded 10-fold. Under Mayor Michael Bloomberg (January 2002 – present), they’re higher than ever. At the same time, New York police provide little information. As a result, few New Yorkers know their city conducts “a historically unprecedented marijuana arrest crusade.”

Cops involved up to top commanders benefit. Marijuana busts are safe. Involved officers and supervisors accrue overtime pay, and produce numbers showing productivity. [[[ *** All a waste of energy compared to a singl legalize bill with price controls as well *** ]]]

In contrast, those arrested are harmed even if not prosecuted. Procedures include handcuffing, fingerprinting, photographing, and potentially obtaining DNA samples. Often people with no criminal records are affected. Henceforth they’ll have one and plenty of baggage.

Whether or not convicted, employment and educational opportunities, mortgages or other loans, public housing benefits, licenses, travel visas, and good credit standing are at risk.

Moreover, arrests and overnight custody alone are humiliating, degrading, alienating and unjust for possessing small amounts of controlled substances, especially marijuana that long ago should have been legalized.

Last September, New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly responded to public pressure. As a result, he ordered commanders not to arrest people possessing small marijuana amounts unless they’re in public view.

In 1979, New York state decriminalized amounts of 25 grams or less. Henceforth, displaying it publicly became low-level misdemeanors, subject to ticketing, not arrests or jailing.

New York City’s stop-and-frisk policy drew widespread criticism. Mostly Black and Hispanic males are targeted. Police routinely confront them, demand their pockets be emptied, and if marijuana is displayed, they’re arrested for having it in public view. As a result, around 50,000 annually are criminalized unjustly.

At the time, critics called Kelly’s action important. Chief Legal Aid Society attorney Steven Banks said it would make a tremendous difference to wrongfully targeted young minorities.

Drug Policy Alliance executive director Ethan Nadelmann called the order a significant change in how police deal with minor marijuana possession cases. Hopefully, “gross racial disparity” would be curbed.

Kelly’s order in part read:

“Questions have been raised about the processing of certain marijuana arrests.” Henceforth, “(a) crime will not be charged to an individual who is requested or compelled to engage in the behavior that results in the public display of marijuana.” Displaying it must be “actively undertaken of the subject’s own volition.”

Queens College sociologist Harry G. Levine said public defenders and legal aid lawyers estimate up to three-fourths of those arrested displayed it on police orders. Those affected don’t know they’re illegal, but police are very intimidating.

Last year, Brooklyn Democratic assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries and Republican Senator Mark Grisanti sponsored legislation to downgrade small possession public displays from misdemeanors to a lessor violations. Bloomberg opposed them, claiming it would encourage greater use.

Despite Kelly’s order, marijuana arrests declined slightly but continue. So does NYPD’s racist crusade. Bloomberg supports it. So does Kelly tacitly. In 2010, one in every seven city arrests were for displaying marijuana in public view. Illegal police searches and false charges were mostly responsible.

Last year, New York’s illegal stop-and-frisk policy affected over 600,000 people, overwhelmingly young Black and Hispanic males. Despite Kelly’s order, illegal arrests continue. Institute for Juvenile Reform and Alternatives member Chino Hardin said “build(ing) a movement to stop” New York’s crusade is essential.

On December 8, the ACLU called “NYPD Pot Arrests Habit….Tough to Break,” saying:

Police Commissioner Kelly’s order lowered arrests slightly, but maintained New York’s distinction as “the marijuana arrest capital of the world. This just won’t do.”

City Hall policy is at fault. People of color are aggressively targeted for petty offenses like “graffiti, disorderly conduct, and – you guessed it – minor marijuana possession.”

Ingrained habits are hard to break. Kelly’s order lacked teeth, especially without City Hall’s endorsement.

As a result, New York Black and Hispanic youths face unrelenting persecution unless public pressure forces legislative relief. It’s long overdue nationwide with teeth.

Stephen Lendman lives in Chicago and can be reached at lendmanstephen@sbcglobal.net.

Also visit his blog site at sjlendman.blogspot.com and listen to cutting-edge discussions with distinguished guests on the Progressive Radio News Hour on the Progressive Radio Network Thursdays at 10AM US Central time and Saturdays and Sundays at noon. All programs are archived for easy listening.

http://www.progressiveradionetwork.com/the-progressive-news-hour/

 

 

[[[ *** RESPONSE *** ]]]

1) New York’s 1973 Rockefeller drug laws are most pernicious. Anyone convicted of selling two ounces or more of heroin, morphine, “raw or prepared opium,” cocaine, or cannabis, or possessing four ounces of the same substances receive mandatory 15-year minimum sentences up a maximum of 25 years to life.

Someone gets high for a day for using what he grew that Mother Nature provided, then all the taxpayers get to support his a$$ for life? Keep at it USA, this way we can be sure that USA will never be a viable super power, all the money is spent on prisons and all the population is in prison. Meanwhile the Senate or Congress or what not enjoys whatever psychedelics they like at parties, the double standards are unbelievable . . .

2) In addition, it’s a growing revenue source for budget-strapped states. It also produces jobs when they’re most needed. It’s a win-win, regardless of outdated, counterproductive and repressive federal policies.

Supporting a supposed ‘criminal’s’ (who decides what is criminal?) a$$ in prison is NOT A JOB that any self respecting person weant to do. It may pay well but only the most corruoted souls on the planet would want to do that sort of job. Even the homeless and beggars have more dignity and principles, get a REAL job so-called government employees, and the state should produce REAL jobs . . . enriching prison contractors is just institutionalized corruption . . . USA sucks, and the writer sucks for sayong jobs are produced when the economy is being destroyed and productivity is wasted, human rights abused . . .

3) In Gonzales v. Raich (2005), the High Court ruled that Congress, under the Constitution’s Commerce Clause, may criminalize the production and use of home-grown cannabis, even where states approve it for medicinal purposes. More on that below.

Who are these ‘high court’ people? Who are their affiliates? What phenotypes are they of? Who are their business partners and friends, fellow colluders? Identify all these groups and the neo-feudalist, lack of neutrality/democracy faction of the USA is exposed. Voters must find this out and make sure that these people from above groups are NEVER voted into power or heck, even promoted into positions of power like ‘High Court’. These are plants that grow on their own, and have been placed there by ‘God’ if you believe in ‘God’, for humanity to use. No group of people have authority, least of all by threat of incarceration or arms to prevent any person from using these things. Barring the ‘psychic’ issue which doubtless can be worked around with secure usage facilities and perhaps specialty districts, there is no democratic or human rights basis for preventing people from using psychedelics AS per their desire and with informed consent

4) Despite Kelly’s order, marijuana arrests declined slightly but continue. So does NYPD’s racist crusade. Bloomberg supports it. So does Kelly tacitly. In 2010, one in every seven city arrests were for displaying marijuana in public view. Illegal police searches and false charges were mostly responsible. Last year, New York’s illegal stop-and-frisk policy affected over 600,000 people, overwhelmingly young Black and Hispanic males. Despite Kelly’s order, illegal arrests continue. Institute for Juvenile Reform and Alternatives member Chino Hardin said “build(ing) a movement to stop” New York’s crusade is essential.

Ok so 3 abusers have been fingered here. Mayor Bloomberg, Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly and Youth Organizer and Campaign Coordinator for the Prison Moratorium Project Chino Hardin. Kick them out of office by not voting them where they cannot use the vast powers of government to harm ordinary people looking to enjoy a simple high. It’s just a high. In Chino’s case set up a parallel but opposing Institution At most offer, ‘Psychedelics use rooms’ where the users can isolate themselves and when sobered up can go out again to live a normal life. Itt is unconscionable to arrest then burden the taxpayers.